1 page, oblong 8vo, accomplished in manuscript. Authorizing the sloop Venus of Sag Harbor to land in the Port of Boston. -- HOWARD, John Eager (1752-1827) Colonel, Continental Army. Autograph letter signed ("J.E. Howard") as Colonel to an unidentified correspondent, 7 February 1787[?]. 2 pages, 8vo. Fine. Howard, a Marylander, one of the most outstanding officers in the Continental Army, played a key role in the victories at Cowpens and is mentioned in the later anthem "Maryland, My Maryland," tells the recipient the bearer will provide him with a trunk if necessary. Rare. -- LEE, Henry ("Light-Horse") (1756-1818), Lt. Col., Cavalry commander. Autograph letter signed ("Henry Lee") with initialed postscript, to Messrs. Leroy & Bayard, n.p., n.d. 1½ pages, 4to, neatly inlaid. Detailed letter on financial matters: "I wish only to place my money in your hands subject to my bills in order to erect a large number of mills...I have written to Col. Hamilton as my friend to whom refer if you think proper..." -- HUGER, Isaac (1743-1797) General. Partly printed document signed ("Is. Huger"), South Carolina, 1 July 1785. 1 page, 4to, with wax seal. Warrant ordering Thomas Singleton to attend court in a lawsuit. Huger, who served in the Southern campaigns with distinction, commanding Virginia troops, confirms on the verso that he has served the defendant the notice. -- JONES, Allen (1739-1807) General of Militia, delegate to Continental Congress. Autograph letter signed ("Allen Jones Br. Gl."), to an unidentified correspondent, Camp Taylors Ferry, 13 May 1781. 1 full page, oblong 4to, backed, hole from seal affects several words text. A distinguished militia commander in North Carolina, Jones states he is awaiting orders, after the latter has read the enclosed letter from the Marquis [Lafayette] "directing the greatest attention to be paid to the Boats at this place;" he has requested Maj. Hogg to remain "till further orders from you," as there is no officer of his brigade with whom he can trust the command. -- WASHINGTON, William (1752-1810) Major. Autograph signed letter ("W.Washington") as Colonel to an unidentified correspondent, Shepperd's Town, 11 March 1800. 1 full page, folio. Fine. A relative of the First President, Washington commanded Virginia cavalry units in the Revolution, participating in many key battles of the Southern campaigns, in which he was twice wounded. Washington, recommissioned a Brigadier General in 1798, requests his pay, not having received any subsistance since being in the service; he gives detailed dates and places of his various postings. -- RUTLEDGE, John (1739-1800), South Carolina Governor, patriot. Autograph letter signed ("J.Rutledge") as Governor TO GENERAL BENJAMIN LINCOLN, undated [docketed 9 August 1779]. 1 page, 4to, neatly inlaid. Letter written during the seige of Charleston, when Rutledge was named Governor, confirming that "it will be very proper, to send some Artillery" to George Town as proposed by Lincoln. Rare in war-date letters. -- WILLIAMSON, Andrew (1730-1786), Militia officer, turncoat. Autograph letter signed ("A.W.mson") as Brigadier General, to the Gov. of Georgia, Camp at Augusta, 26 March 1780. 3 pages, 4to, neatly inlaid. Williamson, state commander of S.C. militia requires the Governor's urgent help in "putting the militia of this state on a certain footting," complaining of the "Waste of Provisions of Ammunition." Williamson was captured and paroled, then joined the British and passed information to them; he was later pardoned. -- RAMSAY, David (1749-1815), physician, historian. Autograph letter signed ("David Ramsay"), to Major General Lincoln, Philadelphia, 3 September 1781. 2 pages, 4to. Ramsay regrets not to have seen Lincoln in person before his departure. He has written an account of the General's campaigns in South Carolina and now wants his "sentiments in writing reflecting my account...where I should enlarge, where alter, & where I should add...If I have in any place misrepresented your motives you will oblige me much by correcting me. I wish to give a candid & influential account of the war in South Carolina." (8) " /> [REVOLUTIONARY WAR, SOUTHERN CAMPAIGNS]. LINCOLN, Benjamin (1733-1810), <I>Major General.</I> Partly printed document signed ("B.Lincoln") as Customs Collector, Port of Boston, Boston, 6 June 1808. <I>1 page, oblong 8vo, accomplished in manuscript.</I> Authorizing the sloop <I>Venus</I> of Sag Harbor to land in the Port of Boston. -- HOWARD, John Eager (1752-1827) <I>Colonel, Continental Army</I>. Autograph letter signed ("J.E. Howard") as Colonel to an unidentified correspondent, 7 February 1787[?]. <I>2 pages, 8vo. Fine.</I> Howard, a Marylander, one of the most outstanding officers in the Continental Army, played a key role in the victories at Cowpens and is mentioned in the later anthem "Maryland, My Maryland," tells the recipient the bearer will provide him with a trunk if necessary. Rare. -- LEE, Henry ("Light-Horse") (1756-1818), </I>Lt. Col., Cavalry commander.</I> Autograph letter signed ("Henry Lee") with initialed postscript, to Messrs. Leroy & Bayard, n.p., n.d. <I>1½ pages, 4to, neatly inlaid.</I> Detailed letter on financial matters: "I wish only to place my money in your hands subject to my bills in order to erect a large number of mills...I have written to Col. Hamilton as my friend to whom refer if you think proper..." -- HUGER, Isaac (1743-1797) <I>General</I>. Partly printed document signed ("Is. Huger"), South Carolina, 1 July 1785. <I>1 page, 4to, with wax seal.</I> Warrant ordering Thomas Singleton to attend court in a lawsuit. Huger, who served in the Southern campaigns with distinction, commanding Virginia troops, confirms on the verso that he has served the defendant the notice. -- JONES, Allen (1739-1807) <I>General of Militia, delegate to Continental Congress</I>. Autograph letter signed ("Allen Jones Br. Gl."), to an unidentified correspondent, Camp Taylors Ferry, 13 May 1781. <I>1 full page, oblong 4to, backed, hole from seal affects several words text.</I> A distinguished militia commander in North Carolina, Jones states he is awaiting orders, after the latter has read the enclosed letter from the Marquis [Lafayette] "directing the greatest attention to be paid to the Boats at this place;" he has requested Maj. Hogg to remain "till further orders from you," as there is no officer of his brigade with whom he can trust the command. -- WASHINGTON, William (1752-1810) <I>Major</I>. Autograph signed letter ("W.Washington") as Colonel to an unidentified correspondent, Shepperd's Town, 11 March 1800. <I>1 full page, folio.</I> Fine. A relative of the First President, Washington commanded Virginia cavalry units in the Revolution, participating in many key battles of the Southern campaigns, in which he was twice wounded. Washington, recommissioned a Brigadier General in 1798, requests his pay, not having received any subsistance since being in the service; he gives detailed dates and places of his various postings. -- RUTLEDGE, John (1739-1800), <I>South Carolina Governor, patriot</I>. Autograph letter signed ("J.Rutledge") as Governor TO GENERAL BENJAMIN LINCOLN, undated [docketed 9 August 1779]. <I>1 page, 4to, neatly inlaid.</I> Letter written during the seige of Charleston, when Rutledge was named Governor, confirming that "it will be very proper, to send some Artillery" to George Town as proposed by Lincoln. Rare in war-date letters. -- WILLIAMSON, Andrew (1730-1786), <I>Militia officer, turncoat</I>. Autograph letter signed ("A.W.mson") as Brigadier General, to the Gov. of Georgia, Camp at Augusta, 26 March 1780. <I>3 pages, 4to, neatly inlaid.</I> Williamson, state commander of S.C. militia requires the Governor's urgent help in "putting the militia of this state on a certain footting," complaining of the "Waste of Provisions of Ammunition." Williamson was captured and paroled, then joined the British and passed information to them; he was later pardoned. -- RAMSAY, David (1749-1815), <I>physician, historian.</I> Autograph letter signed ("David Ramsay"), to Major General Lincoln, Philadelphia, 3 September 1781. <I>2 pages, 4to.</I> Ramsay regrets not to have seen Lincoln in person before his departure. He has written an account of the General's campaigns in South Carolina and now wants his "sentiments in writing reflecting my account...where I should enlarge, where alter, & where I should add...If I have in any place misrepresented your motives you will oblige me much by correcting me. I wish to give a candid & influential account of the war in South Carolina." (8) | Christie's