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    Sale 1970

    Post-War And Contemporary First Open

    1 April 2008, New York, Rockefeller Plaza

  • Lot 66

    Richard Prince (b. 1949)

    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed twice 'Richard Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten.

    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed and numbered 'Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten.

    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed and numbered 'Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten. (3)

    Price Realised  

    Estimate

    Richard Prince (b. 1949)
    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed twice 'Richard Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten.

    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed and numbered 'Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten.

    Untitled (Three Men Looking in the Same Direction)
    signed and numbered 'Prince' (on the reverse)
    color coupler print
    20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
    Executed in 1978. This work is from an edition of ten. (3)


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    Provenance

    Private collection, New England
    Gift from the above to the present owner, mid 1980s


    Saleroom Notice

    Please note Diego Cortez, New York is incorrectly listed as provenance in the catalogue.


    Pre-Lot Text

    "By Generating what appears to be a double, it might be possible to represent what the original photograph or picture imagined...More technological than mechanical, more a simulation than an expression, the result is a photograph that's the closest thing to the real thing. And since I feel a bit more comfortable, perhaps more reassured around a picture that appears to be truer than it really is, I find the best way for me to make it real is to make it again, and making it again is enough for me and certainly, personally speaking, almost me."
    (Richard Prince as quoted in L. Phillips, Richard Prince, New York, 1992, p. 28)