2 pages, 4to, , WITH NOTES OF ELEANOR ROOSEVELT on first page. With a United Auto Workers booklet, 110pp. A frank letter in which Reuther (President of the UAW) spells out the Union position on the short workweek, blaming high levels of unemployment on large corporations, and proposing a "flexible workweek." Eleanor Roosevelt has pencilled notes at the top of Reuther's letter. The rise of a powerful trade union movement was one of the most significant social phenomenon of the Roosevelt era; in the twelve years that followed FDR's inauguration, union ranks grew fivefold, from less than 3 to 14 million. " /> [ROOSEVELT, Eleanor.] REUTHER, Walter. Typed letter signed ("Walter") TO ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Detroit, Mich., 22 June 1962. <I>2 pages, 4to, </I>, WITH NOTES OF ELEANOR ROOSEVELT <I>on first page</I>. With a United Auto Workers booklet, <I>110pp</I>. A frank letter in which Reuther (President of the UAW) spells out the Union position on the short workweek, blaming high levels of unemployment on large corporations, and proposing a "flexible workweek." Eleanor Roosevelt has pencilled notes at the top of Reuther's letter. The rise of a powerful trade union movement was one of the most significant social phenomenon of the Roosevelt era; in the twelve years that followed FDR's inauguration, union ranks grew fivefold, from less than 3 to 14 million. | Christie's