• Lot 140

    TABATIERE EN VERRE JAUNE SCULPTE

    CHINE, PROBABLEMENT IMPERIALE, ATTRIBUEE AUX ATELIERS DU PALAIS, BEIJING, XVIIIEME-XIXEME SIECLE

    Price Realised  

    TABATIERE EN VERRE JAUNE SCULPTE
    CHINE, PROBABLEMENT IMPERIALE, ATTRIBUEE AUX ATELIERS DU PALAIS, BEIJING, XVIIIEME-XIXEME SIECLE
    De forme poire aplatie, les deux faces rehaussées du symbole Yinyang entouré des huit trigrammes, chaque côté rehaussé du symbole daoïste répété trois fois, le bouchon en corail sculpté d'un daim, d'un chilong et d'une pêche
    Hauteur: 6,5 cm. (2½ in.)


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    Imperial yellow glass was a staple at the Imperial glassworks from the late Kangxi period onwards, being mentioned as early as 1702 in contemporary sources. Several varieties of yellow were used simultaneously. This is an example of the deep, rich, lemon-yellow color which confirms its Courtly status since, on early wares, yellow was reserved exclusively for Court use (although the Imperial Records state that Imperial-yellow objects were distributed by the Emperor from time to time).
    The yinyang dichotomy is one of the most powerful of Chinese designs, representing cosmic duality. Within the circle, which represents unified, undifferentiated oneness, are two similarly shaped interlocking units representing duality. These two are assigned to represent certain contrasting elements - male/female, dark/light, and so forth. Each contains an element of the other, demonstrating that they are inextricably linked. In the symbol, everything is balanced, representing the universal harmony when everything finds its proper place in the universal scheme. Yinyang, therefore, also acts as a symbol of enlightened harmony.
    The Eight Trigrams are symbolizing the eight natural phenomena: qian (heaven), kun (earth), zhen (thunder), xun (wind), kan (water), li (fire), gen (mountain) and dui (pool). They form the divination system of Daoism.
    For comparable Daoist motifs, see the boxwood and amber double-gourd snuff bottle from the J & J collection, sold in our New York Rooms, 30 March 2005, lot 42

    Special Notice

    Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.
    No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT payable at 19.6% (5.5% for books) will be added to the buyer’s premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis


    Provenance

    R. Hall, London, 1986


    Pre-Lot Text

    FROM THE COLLECTION OF A PRIVATE AMATEUR
    PART ONE
    (LOT 140 - LOT 209)


    Post Lot Text

    A FINE CARVED YELLOW GLASS SNUFF BOTTLE
    CHINA, PROBABLY IMPERIAL, ATTRIBUTED TO THE PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, 18TH/19TH CENTURY