SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE SAMUEL HUNTINGTON; issued at New London, Connecticut, 16 July 1793. 1 page, folio, large papered seal at lower left, red wax seal of Connecticut at bottom, minor discoloration along several folds, neat repairs from verso, small hole to left of signature mended, finely matted with two portraits and glazed in a fine black- and gilt-wood frame. THREE-LANGUAGE SHIP'S PAPERS for the sloop Hannah, commanded by John McCarty, sailing from New London to Hispaniola carrying a very assorted cargo of "Fish, Flour, Bread, Butter, Lard, Onions, Sheep, Hogs and Stores." The document, with text in separate columns for French, English and Dutch, attempted to insure safe passage for American ships by declaring "that no subjects of the present belligerent powers have any part or portion therein, directly nor indirectly," and requests that the vessel therefore be allowed to "pass, navigate and frequent the ports...to transact his business...." Such ship's papers, intended to protect merchantmen from molestation by the naval vessels of the belligerents in the Napoleonic wars, were largely infeffective, in spite of their imposing and very official appearance. Fine examples signed by Washington and Jefferson are increasingly scarce. " /> WASHINGTON, George. Partly printed document signed ("G:Washington") as President, COUNTERSIGNED BY SECRETARY OF STATE THOMAS JEFFERSON ("Th:Jefferson") and by <I>SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE SAMUEL HUNTINGTON</I>; issued at New London, Connecticut, 16 July 1793. <I>1 page, folio, large papered seal at lower left, red wax seal of Connecticut at bottom, minor discoloration along several folds, neat repairs from verso, small hole to left of signature mended, finely matted with two portraits and glazed in a fine black- and gilt-wood frame.</I> THREE-LANGUAGE SHIP'S PAPERS for the sloop <I>Hannah</I>, commanded by John McCarty, sailing from New London to Hispaniola carrying a very assorted cargo of "Fish, Flour, Bread, Butter, Lard, Onions, Sheep, Hogs and Stores." The document, with text in separate columns for French, English and Dutch, attempted to insure safe passage for American ships by declaring "that no subjects of the present belligerent powers have any part or portion therein, directly nor indirectly," and requests that the vessel therefore be allowed to "pass, navigate and frequent the ports...to transact his business...." Such ship's papers, intended to protect merchantmen from molestation by the naval vessels of the belligerents in the Napoleonic wars, were largely infeffective, in spite of their imposing and very official appearance. Fine examples signed by Washington and Jefferson are increasingly scarce. | Christie's