Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait etching at a Window. Etching and drypoint, 1648, on laid paper, without watermark

​Before the mirror: Rembrandt’s self-portrait etchings

From the confidence of youth to sombre middle age, how the Dutch Master’s vision of himself morphed and reflected his fortunes through the years. Illustrated with works offered in Three Northern Masters and previously sold at Christie’s

Few other artists depicted themselves as regularly and with such variety and psychological insight as Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669). He painted himself before the mirror on at least 40 occasions, and etched no fewer than 32 self-portraits in a career that stretched over three decades.

During Classic Week in London, two self-portrait etchings by the Dutch printmaker, draughtsman and painter will be offered in Three Northern Masters, an online sale. 

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait, with Curly Hair and White Collar Bust. Etching, circa 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate 57 x 50  mm. Sheet 60 x 51  mm. Sold for £8,750 on 14 December 2017  at Christie’s in London

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait, with Curly Hair and White Collar: Bust. Etching, circa 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate 57 x 50 mm. Sheet 60 x 51 mm. Sold for £8,750 on 14 December 2017 at Christie’s in London

Self-portrait prints are among the earliest that Rembrandt produced. Self-Portrait with Curly Hair and White Collar  was made sometime around 1630, when the artist was in his early twenties and living in Leiden. His young features, set against a shock of curly hair, are carefully rendered; his formal pose and steady gaze convey a studied gravity. The chiaroscuro effects, created only with hatched and crosshatched lines, reveal the young artist’s facility with the medium.

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait Open-Mouthed, as If Shouting Bust. Etching, 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Sheet 66 x 56  mm. Sold for £5,625 on 14 December 2017  at Christie’s in London

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait Open-Mouthed, as If Shouting: Bust. Etching, 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Sheet 66 x 56 mm. Sold for £5,625 on 14 December 2017 at Christie’s in London

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Beggar Seated on a Bank. Etching, 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate 116 x 70  mm. Sheet 140 x 94  mm. Sold for £20,000 on 14 December 2017  at Christie’s in London

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Beggar Seated on a Bank. Etching, 1630, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate 116 x 70 mm. Sheet 140 x 94 mm. Sold for £20,000 on 14 December 2017 at Christie’s in London

In other self-portrait etchings from this time, Rembrandt used his own features to model the physiognomy of human emotions. These works, in which the artist depicted himself shouting, laughing or frowning, not only demonstrate his virtuosity as an artist, but also served as character studies for his religious or history paintings. 

Self-Portrait Open-Mouthed, as If Shouting  (1630) was the model for Beggar Seated on a Bank, an etching produced later that year. It was also the basis for the agonised face of Christ in Christ on the Cross, which Rembrandt painted in 1631.

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait with Saskia. Etching, 1636, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate & Sheet 103 x 91 mm. This lot was offered in 
Three Northern Masters
, 27 June to 3 July 2019, Online, and sold for £6,875

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait with Saskia. Etching, 1636, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate & Sheet 103 x 91 mm. This lot was offered in Three Northern Masters , 27 June to 3 July 2019, Online, and sold for £6,875

Although the artist moved away from these explicit studies of human emotion, his self-portraits after 1630 often display an ongoing interest in character and persona. In 1631 Rembrandt moved to Amsterdam and very quickly achieved acclaim as an artist and portraitist. 

Rembrandt married Saskia van Uylenburgh in July 1634, and his wife became one of his favourite models. Self-Portrait with Saskia, an etching produced only two years after their marriage, depicts the 30-year-old artist and his new bride, and is the only etching he made of himself with Saskia. 

Both are wearing historical clothing — Rembrandt enjoyed play-acting and only twice represented himself as a contemporary Amsterdam gentleman. The etching also marks the first time that Rembrandt presented himself as an artist at work.


Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait in a Velvet Cap with Plume, c. 1638. Etching, circa 1638, on thin laid paper, without watermark. Plate 136 x 105  mm. Sheet 143 x 111  mm. This lot was offered in Old Master Prints on 14 December 2017  at Christie’s in London and sold for £10,000

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait in a Velvet Cap with Plume, c. 1638. Etching, circa 1638, on thin laid paper, without watermark. Plate 136 x 105 mm. Sheet 143 x 111 mm. This lot was offered in Old Master Prints on 14 December 2017 at Christie’s in London and sold for £10,000

In Self-Portrait in a Velvet Cap with Plume  (1638) Rembrandt depicts himself in 16th-century costume — a fur-lined coat and feathered hat — perhaps attempting to place himself among the great artists of the Northern European Renaissance. 

Produced 10 years later, Self-Portrait Etching at a Window  reflects a very different sensibility. Dressed in plain clothes, the artist sits in front of a copper plate, etching needle in hand, studying his reflection intently in a mirror. The intervening decade had been marked by personal tragedy, most notably the death in 1642 of Rembrandt’s wife, Saskia, and the steady decline of the artist’s finances.

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait etching at a Window. Etching and drypoint, 1648, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate & Sheet 161 x 132 mm. Offered in 
Three Northern Masters
, 27 June to 3 July 2019, Online, and sold for £10,625

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn (1606-1669), Self-Portrait etching at a Window. Etching and drypoint, 1648, on laid paper, without watermark. Plate & Sheet 161 x 132 mm. Offered in Three Northern Masters , 27 June to 3 July 2019, Online, and sold for £10,625

If the Rembrandt of Self-Portrait in a Velvet Cap with Plume  is flamboyant and self-aggrandising, Self-Portrait Etching at a Window  presents a sober view of the artist in middle age. The heavily shadowed interior, lit by a single light source, recalls Rembrandt’s 1642 etching Saint Jerome in His Dark Chamber. Rembrandt worked up the plate gradually, lightly etching the preliminary composition, and then adding layers of etching, drypoint and burin, building up the rich contrasts of light and shadow. It was only in the fourth state that he added the view from the window.

More evocative of Italy than the Low Countries, this hilly landscape is clearly not a view from the artist’s Breestraat studio in Amsterdam: it is a work of the imagination, a synthesis of observation and intellect. Although he had never visited Italy, and in his reduced circumstances was increasingly unlikely to, Rembrandt is perhaps showing that he didn’t need to. 

Depicting himself in everyday surroundings, and in the act of creating, Self-Portrait Etching at a Window  is an act of affirmation in the face of adversity. Of all Rembrandt’s etched self-portraits, it is perhaps his most personal. It would be the last he would make in this medium.