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TWO CHELSEA MODELS OF HOGARTH'S DOG 'TRUMP'

CIRCA 1747-50, AFTER THE MODEL BY LOUIS-FRANÇOIS ROUBILIAC

Details
TWO CHELSEA MODELS OF HOGARTH'S DOG 'TRUMP'
CIRCA 1747-50, AFTER THE MODEL BY LOUIS-FRANçOIS ROUBILIAC
Modelled to the left and to the right respectively, with heads up and lying on shaped bases, with one forepaw tucked under, both with some restoration
10 5/8in. (27cm.) wide (2)

Lot Essay

The present lot is the only known pair to be offered at auction. While mirror images have been found over the last half century, this find should reinforce the theory that this model and its opposing example were modelled by Chesea as a pair.

There are only three other single models known. The first example was sold by Christie's London, October 24, 1966, lot 2 and was acquired by Winifred Williams on behalf of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The second example was from the Rous Lench Collection, sold at Sotheby's London, July 1, 1986, lot 198 and is the only known coloured model. The third is most probably the example from the collection of Mr. Lionel Geneen, mentioned in J.V.G. Mallet's article in Apollo, 1969, vol 90, no. 90, pp. 100-111, titled 'Rococo English Porcelain: a study in style, and later offered anonymously at Sotheby's London, November 19, 1991, lot 208.
A clear link has been established between William Hogarth and a fairly tight circle of artists which was centered around the St. Martin's Lane Academy and Old Slaughter's Coffee House. Louis François Roubiliac, a member of this group, immortalized Hogarth's favorite pug, Trump, in a now lost terra-cotta model. This model and the well-known bust of Hogarth can be identified by the first plate found in Samuel Ireland's, Graphic Illustrations of Hogarth, published May 1, 1799. The same model was also listed in the effects of Hogarth's widow in 1789. In addition, Nicholas Sprimont, the director of the Chelsea factory, kept his premises on Compton Street around the corner. A fellow emigré, Sprimont also stood as Godfather to Roubiliac's daughter, Sophie.

For a comprehensive discussion of these models see J.V.G. Mallet's article in the Victoria and Albert Museum Bulletin, April 1967, vol. III, no. 2, titled 'Hogarth's pug in porcelain', pp. 45 - 54.
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