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[DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll")]. Sir John Tenniel's illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Alice through the Looking Glass. Text by Leo John de Freitas. Blewbury: Jonathan Stephenson at the Rocket Press for Macmillan, 1987.
[DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll")]. Sir John Tenniel's illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Alice through the Looking Glass. Text by Leo John de Freitas. Blewbury: Jonathan Stephenson at the Rocket Press for Macmillan, 1987.

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[DODGSON, Charles Lutwidge ("Lewis Carroll")]. Sir John Tenniel's illustrations to Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Alice through the Looking Glass. Text by Leo John de Freitas. Blewbury: Jonathan Stephenson at the Rocket Press for Macmillan, 1987.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: 41 wood-block engravings and one electrotype after Sir John Tenniel; Through the Looking Glass: 50 wood block engravings after Tenniel. Together 92 prints (240 x 175 mm, sheet size), each within a separate folder with caption, contents loose as issued in two morocco-backed folding boxes; 8o text volume in original cloth; slipcased together.

LIMITED EDITION, NUMBER 102 OF 250 SETS. The set comprises prints of all the original illustrations for Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, all but one printed by Jonathan Stephenson from the original wood-blocks engraved by George and Edward Dalziel from drawings by John Tenniel. The Dalziel Brothers were the leading commercial wood-engravers of the Victorian age, and worked with the most celebrated illustrators and artists of the period, including Millais, Burne-Jones and Cruikshank.

The illustrations in the earliest editions of both books were in fact all printed from electrotypes made from the Dalziel-engraved wood-blocks, as the wood block engravings were not considered suitable for repeated use. Although the blocks were used for trial runs, no complete edition of all 92 illustrations was ever printed directly from them.

Although engraved blocks from the 19th century were generally re-used or destroyed, in 1985 the Dalziel "Alice" blocks were rediscovered, having been stored in a bank vault in London. Macmillan decided to use them all for the first time to produce this limited edition of the original illustrations taken directly from the wood-blocks. Only one block ("Alice and the Dodo") had been mislaid, and this was instead reprinted from the electrotype. (2)
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