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A GEORGE I PEWTER-INLAID STAINED FIELD-MAPLE 'MULBERRY WOOD' BUREAU
A GEORGE I PEWTER-INLAID STAINED FIELD-MAPLE 'MULBERRY WOOD' BUREAU

IN THE MANNER OF COXED AND WOSTER

Details
A GEORGE I PEWTER-INLAID STAINED FIELD-MAPLE 'MULBERRY WOOD' BUREAU
In the manner of Coxed and Woster
Feather-banded overall and inlaid with pewter lines, the hinged slope enclosing a fitted interior with drawers and pigeon-holes around a sliding well and leather-lined writing-surface, above two short and two long graduated drawers, on later bun feet, the central moulding on the right-hand side replaced, the top possibly reveneered in yew
38 in. (97 cm.) high; 25 in. (65.5 cm.) wide; 19 in. (50 cm.) deep

Lot Essay

G. Coxed and T. Woster traded from c.1690 until 1736, when Thomas Woster died. They specialised in the making of bureau and bureau-cabinets, the first recorded bureau being produced in 1693.
Coxed and Woster are often associated with so-called 'mulberry' furniture - furniture veneered in maple or alder stained to resemble tortoiseshell, so producing a rich golden tone. The use of pewter inlay often appeared in their earlier work.
Although Coxed and Woster were in production until 1736, the majority of their 'mulberry wood' furniture was produced between c. 1690 and c. 1720, the rich appearance of the 'mulberry' being in keeping with the tastes of the time for lavish-looking materials (M. Riccardi-Cubitt, 'Round the Mulberry Bush', Antique Collector, March 1996, pp. 80-85).

A similar bureau was sold anonymously at Sotheby's London, 12 February 1965, lot 66. Another related bureau is illustrated in London, Partridge, Exhibition Catalogue, 1997, no.10.
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