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SCRIPT FOR SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE, 1961
SCRIPT FOR SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE, 1961

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SCRIPT FOR SOMETHING'S GOT TO GIVE, 1961
Screenplay by Arnold Schulman. November 22, 1961. Screenplay. Confidential. For Planning Purposes Only.

Confidentiality notice, mimeographed title page and 138 pages script (printed on rectos only). Bound in light green paper wrapper with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation logo, title on spine (one tear to front cover).

MARILYN MONROE'S COPY, with numerous markings and notes in pencil on 39 pages. On the blank page facing the title she has written:"she maneuvers [sic], she gets him to chase her - he[sic] resents her leaving her husband." On the title page appear a number of notes and page references to the script and the observation "at one point in the story two women like each other but hate the man." Below, she writes, emphatically, "not a story for MM," and adds, "it's for a man and just any two girls except the first 45 pages." On the same page, she apparently records her reactions to the change of screenwriter: "why was the writer who wrote it let go?" and queries "New Producer, How come?" ON page 57, where the stage directions call for Richard and Priscilla to "embrace and kiss passionately," she has added: "but mechanically." On page 58, Monroe likens the towering rage of the forsaken Ellen to the emotions expressed in a song from Lerner and Loew's My Fair Lady, writing "I can do without you, or just you wait, Henry Higgins, just you wait." On page 69, Monroe has pencilled in what appear to be some ideas for the cinematic action. Instead of Ellen banging on the wall of the room honeymoon suite in which Priscilla and Ricahrd are kissing, Marilyn suggests: "she plays a record player very loud - and she does the twist and at certain beats in time with the music she bumps him against the wall." Continuing though, on the next page she writes "Ellen is getting tired her bumps are getting less enthusiastic and sad to put it mildly." Page 87 bears several notes, and the blank page facing it is covered with extensive pencilled notes concerning Ellen's lines, and suggesting a number of lines, including, "Now listen this happens to be a democracy - we're even the 50th state. We are no longer just a possession of the U.S.A." Monroe is caustic about certain weak features of the script: on page 126 in the script, the lines of the character Richard include a particularly awful pun: "You know the old saying - cast your broad upon the waters." In the margin Marilyn writes, "Not funny." On page 130, next to rather silly lines by Priscilla about the availabilty of men, she writes "Not a good speech," and next to Ellen's response to Priscilla, she comments succinctly: "sick." Following the final scene (Richard and Ellen kissing), she writes in large letters: "NO NO NO."
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