POLK, JAMES K. President. Autograph letter signed ("James K. Polk") as Speaker of the House of Representatives, to H. Howard, Columbia, [Tennessee], 19 July 1835. 2 1/2 pages, 4to, 246 x 200mm. (9 3/4 x 8 in.), a few small holes to horizontal folds (not affecting text), two of them neatly repaired from verso, otherwise in good condition. [With:] Autograph free frank ("Free J.K. Polk") on address panel, addressed by Polk to Howard in Nashville, black circular Columbia datestamp and "Free" handstamp.

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POLK, JAMES K. President. Autograph letter signed ("James K. Polk") as Speaker of the House of Representatives, to H. Howard, Columbia, [Tennessee], 19 July 1835. 2 1/2 pages, 4to, 246 x 200mm. (9 3/4 x 8 in.), a few small holes to horizontal folds (not affecting text), two of them neatly repaired from verso, otherwise in good condition. [With:] Autograph free frank ("Free J.K. Polk") on address panel, addressed by Polk to Howard in Nashville, black circular Columbia datestamp and "Free" handstamp.

AN ILLEGAL SALE OF INDIAN RESERVE LANDS

The Speaker of the House explains that Howard's purchase of lands reserved for Native Americans was unlawful: "Your communication...was received, as was also one of similar import from Mr. M. Simon. I attended to your, and his requests, and my impression was that I had written to one or both of you...I certainly intended to do so, but...in the hurry of business I may have neglected to do so. I saw and conversed with the Secretary of War, [Lewis Cass], personally on the subject, and subsequently received from him the enclosed communication...[I]t has been decided at the Department that the Indian Reserves, under whom Mr. Simon, yourself and others claim, had no authority under the Treaty, to sell...[T]he decision...will apply also to you. After the decision had been made; I saw Genl. R.G. Dunlop in Washington, and...I mentioned the subject to him...I understood him to say that he would inquire further into it, and correspond with those interested. This is all the information I can give you..." The lands in question may have been part of the Arkansas tracts reserved for the Chickasaw tribe by the Andrew Jackson's 1818 treaty in which the Chickasaws agreed to cede all their lands east of the Mississippi to the United States.
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