THE PROPERTY OF THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM AND GREENFIELD VILLAGE
FAUQUIER, Francis (1704?-1768), Lieutenant-governor of Virginia. Autograph letter signed TO MAJOR GENERAL JOHN STANWIX (1690-1765), Williamsburg, 3 May 1760. 1¼ pages, 8vo, docketed on verso. Fine. VIRGINIA'S GOVERNOR COMPLAINS THAT "THE ASSEMBLYS ON THIS CONTINENT ARE TOO CAUTIOUS...". A fine letter of Fauquier, who became lieutenant-governor of Virginia in 1758, during the French and Indian War. He quickly took on full gubernatorial duties, however, as the governor-in-chief (the Earl of Loudon) took little part in the colony's government. Here, he discusses the Virginia colonial troops raised to aid the regular Army in the war against the enemy on the frontiers: "...I have done all in my power to have the small Body of Men I am enabled to send his Majesty's Forces, ready to take the Field on the Day you appoint: and I sincerely wish the Assembly had consented to have left me at Liberty to recruit and complete the Regiment to its full Complement. But this is a grievance only to be commented and not redressed." Fauquier complains of the colonies' apparent unwillingness and lack of spirit: "I can't help thinking the Assemblys [colonial assemblies] on this Continent are too cautious on these Occasions. I was in Hopes the noble Spirit wch. shines forth in their Mother Country would have spread its influence, and raised a Spirit of Emulation in its Colonies, to follow the Example set before them. I am much obliged to you for your Opinion of my Zeal in this Cause..." Fauquier perceptively warned in the 1760s of the dangers that increased taxation would produce great unrest in the colonies, but when the Virginia Burgesses passed a resolution condemning the Stamp Act, he dissolved the assembly.

Details
FAUQUIER, Francis (1704?-1768), Lieutenant-governor of Virginia. Autograph letter signed TO MAJOR GENERAL JOHN STANWIX (1690-1765), Williamsburg, 3 May 1760. 1¼ pages, 8vo, docketed on verso. Fine. VIRGINIA'S GOVERNOR COMPLAINS THAT "THE ASSEMBLYS ON THIS CONTINENT ARE TOO CAUTIOUS...". A fine letter of Fauquier, who became lieutenant-governor of Virginia in 1758, during the French and Indian War. He quickly took on full gubernatorial duties, however, as the governor-in-chief (the Earl of Loudon) took little part in the colony's government. Here, he discusses the Virginia colonial troops raised to aid the regular Army in the war against the enemy on the frontiers: "...I have done all in my power to have the small Body of Men I am enabled to send his Majesty's Forces, ready to take the Field on the Day you appoint: and I sincerely wish the Assembly had consented to have left me at Liberty to recruit and complete the Regiment to its full Complement. But this is a grievance only to be commented and not redressed." Fauquier complains of the colonies' apparent unwillingness and lack of spirit: "I can't help thinking the Assemblys [colonial assemblies] on this Continent are too cautious on these Occasions. I was in Hopes the noble Spirit wch. shines forth in their Mother Country would have spread its influence, and raised a Spirit of Emulation in its Colonies, to follow the Example set before them. I am much obliged to you for your Opinion of my Zeal in this Cause..."

Fauquier perceptively warned in the 1760s of the dangers that increased taxation would produce great unrest in the colonies, but when the Virginia Burgesses passed a resolution condemning the Stamp Act, he dissolved the assembly.
;

More from Fine Printed Books and Manuscripts

View All
View All