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A SILVER PRESENTATION WINE COOLER OF HISTORICAL INTEREST
Property of Dr. and Mrs. John Hashim
A SILVER PRESENTATION WINE COOLER OF HISTORICAL INTEREST

MAKER'S MARK OF THOMAS WHARTENBY AND PETER BUMM, PHILADELPHIA, CIRCA 1818

Details
A SILVER PRESENTATION WINE COOLER OF HISTORICAL INTEREST
Maker's mark of Thomas Whartenby and Peter Bumm, Philadelphia, circa 1818
Urn-form on a square base with four winged ram's-head and hoof feet, the lower body of urn chased with band of acanthus, the two bracket handles with ram's head joins, the incurved neck with band of basketweave and foliage, one side engraved with presentation inscription, with removable fitted liner, marked under base of stand, the later domed cover with foliate band and surmounted by an eagle perched on a globe, with an olive branch and a sheaf of arrows, the finial cast from the original belonging to the pair, cover marked E.T. Thompson
15¾in. high; 106oz. 10dwt.
Provenance
Peter Hill, American Arts, 1980
Literature
A Silver Tribute to Valor, National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1981, cat. no. 1, illus. p. 12.
Frank Trapp, ed., Decorative Arts at Amherst College, Mead Museum Monograph 3 (Winter 1981-82), fig. 6.
Exhibited
A Silver Tribute to Valor, Decatur House, Washington, DC, May 15-July 15, 1981

Post Lot Text
[SUPPLEMENTARY IMAGE CAPTION]Stephen Decatur, engraved by unidentified artist after Gilbert Stuart, circa 1817-22, Courtesy National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institutionrt Resource, NY

Lot Essay

The engraved inscription reads: BY CITIZENS OF PHILADELPHIA/TO THEIR TOWNSMAN/COMMODORE DECATUR/ESTEEMED FOR HIS VIRTUE/HONORED FOR HIS VALOUR

This wine cooler, together with its pair in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, formed part of a service presented by the City of Philadelphia to Commodore Stephen Decatur on February 11, 1818. The original gift consisted of the pair of wine coolers, two large salvers, and a set of twelve goblets, all by Whartenby & Bumm. The matching wine cooler is illustrated in Berry B. Tracy, Classical America 1815-1845, Newark Museum, 1963, no. 95.

Stephen Decatur (1779-1820) won fame as a naval hero for his victories in the Barbary Wars, first against Tripoli from 1801-1805, and again against Algiers in 1815. However, it was his capture of the British frigate Macedonian during the War of 1812 that brought him a Congressional gold medal and national acclaim. His native city, Philadelphia, gave him the present drinks service, while Baltimore, his wife's native city, gave him a silver dinner service in 1817. The City of New York presented him with a French gold snuff box "in testimony of the high sense they entertain of his valor & skill in the capture of the British Frigate Macedonian by the U.S. Frigate United States Oct 25 1812."
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