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A ZIEGLER CARPET
No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VA… Read more THE PROPERTY OF THE FREUD MUSEUM, LONDON
A ZIEGLER CARPET

SULTANABAD DISTRICT, WEST PERSIA, CIRCA 1880

Details
A ZIEGLER CARPET
Sultanabad District, West Persia, circa 1880
The pale cream field with bold palmettes issuing angular stylised flowering vine in a pale cream border of flowerheads flanked by serrated leaves together with palmettes and flowering leafy vine meander between golden yellow boteh and flowerhead and ivory floral meander stripes, plain outer cream stripe, ends beginning to fray, localised areas of wear
16ft.6in. x 12ft.9in. (502cm. x 390cm.)
Provenance
Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)
Literature
HALI Vol 33, 1987. pp.10-112
Cutbill, G: An Obsessive Collector
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

The Ziegler carpet offered here was housed in the dining room of Sigmund Freud's home, 20 Maresfield Gardens, in Hampstead, London. In 1938 the renowne father of psychoanalasys, Sigmund Freud and his family arrived in London as refugees from the Nazis in Vienna. They brought with them all of their posessions, including carpets and rugs, furniture and a collection of his prized antiquities. Here his son Ernst and houskeeper Paula Fichtl recreated for him the same working environment as he had had in Vienna.

Freud bought most of his collection from dealers. His brother-in-law Moritz Freud, 1857-1920 (same surname) was a carpet dealer who lived in Berlin. Although there is no proof that Freud purchased his carpets from Moritz it would seem probable that there may have been transactions between them.
Objects in his collection were placed on all surfaces, his carpets and rugs were on the floor, hung on the walls and draped on tables and furniture. Included in this small collection is a now very famous rare Turkoman Asmalyk.

For the last sixteen years of his life Freud suffered from cancer, yet he continued to work in England by maintaining his practice at Maresfield Gardens. After his death in 1939, his wife Martha, their daughter Anna, their houskeeper and his sister-in-law Minna Bernays continued to live in the house. the house remained occupied until the death of Anna Freud in 1982. Following her wishes the house was turned into a museum and opened to the public in 1986.
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