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A rare blue and white 'mythological-subject' octagonal coffee-pot and cover
Christie's charge a buyer's premium of 20.825% of … Read more EUROPEAN SUBJECTS
A rare blue and white 'mythological-subject' octagonal coffee-pot and cover

EARLY 18TH CENTURY

Details
A rare blue and white 'mythological-subject' octagonal coffee-pot and cover
Early 18th Century
After a European silver prototype, of octagonal tapering form supported on three ball feet, painted with figures on horseback and on foot with spears and hounds in a European landscape, below an ornate design border around the upper section enclosing cartouches depicting Europa and the Bull, applied with loop handle and straight spout with scroll stretcher, the domed cover surmounted by a buddhistic lion finial, mounted with small silver loop for a chain, very fine hairline cracks, minute chips and frittings
30 cm. high
Special notice

Christie's charge a buyer's premium of 20.825% of the hammer price for lots with values up to NLG 200,000. If the hammer price exceeds the NLG 200,000 then the premium is calculated at 20.825% of the first NLG 200,000 plus 11.9% of any amount in excess of NLG 200,000.

Lot Essay

A similar coffee-pot in the Rijksmuseum is illustrated by C.J.A. Jörg and J. van Campen, Chinese Ceramics in the Collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Catalogue, p. 275, fig. 318a. Fig. 318b illustrates an example of a Delft Faïence prototype based on a silver model, and also in the Collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Another example is in the Groninger Museum, illustrated by D.F. Lunsingh Scheurleer, Chine de Commande, London, 1974, pl. 128; and an example from the Hodroff collection, in D.S. Howard, The Choice of the Private Trader, London, 1994, pl. 167, p. 154.
C.J.A. Jörg and J. van Campen mention in their catalogue that at the end of the 17th Century, when drinking coffee came into fashion, the first coffee-pots after metal examples with a tapering form were ordered in Japan. The Chinese started to make them soon afterwards and embellished them with a European subject.
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