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Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. (1860-1942)
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price plus bu… Read more PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF RONALD TREE
Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. (1860-1942)

Girl seated on a pier, Walberswick; Mrs Dolly Brown

Details
Philip Wilson Steer, O.M. (1860-1942)
Girl seated on a pier, Walberswick; Mrs Dolly Brown
signed 'P.W. Steer.' (lower right), signed again and inscribed 'On the jetty'/P. Wilson Steer' (on a label attached to the stretcher)
oil on canvas
15 x 23½ in. (38.1 x 59.7 cm.)
Painted circa 1886
Provenance
James Christie; Mrs. Christie.
René Valadon.
Vernon Wethered; Mrs Wethered.
with Leicester Galleries, London, 1954, where purchased by the present owner.
Literature
D.S. MacColl, Life, Work and Setting of Philip Wilson Steer, London, 1945, p. 188.
B. Laughton, Philip Wilson Steer 1860-1942, Oxford, 1971, no. 22, pl. 14.
Exhibited
London, New English Art Club, Spring, April 1887, no. 96 as On the Pierhead.
London, Tate Gallery, Loan Exhibition of Works by P. Wilson Steer, April-July 1929.
Australia and New Zealand, Empire Art Loan Collection Society, 1939-40 (not traced).
Birmingham, The Early Years of the NEAC, 1952, no. 92.
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price plus buyer's premium.

Lot Essay

Bruce Laughton (op. cit., pp. 10-11) comments on the present work, 'Girl on a Pier, Walberswick, which was shown at the NEAC in the spring of 1887, [and] is the earliest of the 'On the Pierhead' series. In this version the horizon is near the top of the picture, so that the water glinting in the sunlight occupies most of the picture surface on either side of the seated girl. She is painted against the light, strongly contrasting in tone with the sea behind her, and there is a light rim round the edge of her pink dress - a contre jour effect which was to fascinate Steer throughout his career. Two studies of the seated girl, in soft lead pencil, occur in the earliest Walberswick sketchbook. In these she is seen almost solely as a pattern of shadows, differentiated in tone by hatched shading. The small canvas sparkles with light, and the direct, loose but confident brushwork is even closer to Manet. It must have been begun in the summer of 1886. Steer was now preoccupied with light, but still using a technique more traditional than the small strokes of broken colour by then common to many followers of Impressionism in France'.
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