[BROADSIDE]. PEMBERTON, ISRAEL, et al. To the Inhabitants of Pennsylvania. The following is a Copy of a Paper we received at half past four o'Clock this Afternoon, and we have since received Orders to prepare for our Banishment To-morrow... [on verso:] To the President and Council of Pennsylvania. The Remonstrance and Protest of the Subscribers..., [Philadelphia: Robert Bell 1777]. 2 pages, folio, edges untrimmed, unobstrusive spotting, otherwise in good condition.

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[BROADSIDE]. PEMBERTON, ISRAEL, et al. To the Inhabitants of Pennsylvania. The following is a Copy of a Paper we received at half past four o'Clock this Afternoon, and we have since received Orders to prepare for our Banishment To-morrow... [on verso:] To the President and Council of Pennsylvania. The Remonstrance and Protest of the Subscribers..., [Philadelphia: Robert Bell 1777]. 2 pages, folio, edges untrimmed, unobstrusive spotting, otherwise in good condition.
An appeal from 22 residents of Philadelphia, principally Quakers, who, according to the order in Council reprinted on the first page, "have uniformly manifested by their general Conduct and Conversation, a Disposition highly inimical to the Cause of America," and are now "imprisoned in the Free-Mason's Lodge in this City," since they have "refused to promise to refrain from corresponding with the Enemy; and also declined to give assurances of allegiance to this State, as of Right they ought." Therefore, the order concludes, "it appears that they consider themselves as Subjects of the King of Great-Britain, the Enemy of this and the other United States of America...." One William Imlay of New York "having behaved in like manner," is also included in the order, and Col. Lewis Nicola is ordered to remove the 23 individuals to Staunton, in Virginia, "there to be treated according to their Characters and Stations...." The extract from Council Orders which occupies page 1 is signed in type by Timothy Matlack, Secretary. At the bottom, those arrested characterize the Council's order as "the highest Act of Tyranny that has been exercised in any Age or Country, where the Shadow of Liberty was left..." The second page of the document prints the detainees' lengthy protest, which terms the Council's act "contrary to the inherent rights of mankind" resulting from an "unreasonable excess of power." For an earlier broadside on the same arrests see lot , and c.f. Evans 15496, 15497, 15500 and 15501.
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