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A GERMAN BRONZE FIGURE OF KASSANDRA, cast from a model by Max Klinger, the prophetess shown half length, wearing a classical robe held across one breast by a bejewelled strap, her hair held in a band and chignon, signed M. Klinger fec. and inscribed AKT. GES. GLADENBECK FRIEDRICHSHAGEN., on shaped striated black marble socle, early 20th Century

Details
A GERMAN BRONZE FIGURE OF KASSANDRA, cast from a model by Max Klinger, the prophetess shown half length, wearing a classical robe held across one breast by a bejewelled strap, her hair held in a band and chignon, signed M. Klinger fec. and inscribed AKT. GES. GLADENBECK FRIEDRICHSHAGEN., on shaped striated black marble socle, early 20th Century
22¾in. (58cm.) high
Literature
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE:
P. Kühn, Max Klinger, Leipzig, 1907, pp.379-84 & 392-7
A. Dückers, Max Klinger, Berlin, 1976, p. 57 & 81
Frankfurt am Main, Städtische Galerie, Max Klinger 1857-1920, 1992, nos. 43-6

Lot Essay

Max Klinger (1857-1920) studied at the Academies of Karlsruhe and Berlin. He achieved initial fame for his original and poetic graphic work and thence for his painting. He turned to sculpture during the 1880's when his interest was aroused by the chromatic possibilities of sculpture.
Klinger was in Italy in 1886 to select the marble for a fireplace at the Villa Albers for which he was executing the frescoes. and it was there that he become fascinated with the material. That same year he executed his first sketch for the Beethoven and realised his initial conception of the Salome. Klinger returned to Rome in 1889 and lived there until 1892, it was here that he undertook a systematic study of sculpture.
The Kassandra was first exhibited in 1896 at the Leipzig Kunstverein and then in Berlin, it returned to Leipzig and became a permanent exhibit at the Leipzig Museum. We know from a letter to his parents dated 1882, that the head was ready and painted, and that Klinger was working on the torso. Her head and neck were carved in Carrara marble, the torso in Grechetto marble, her drapery in alabaster and onyx, her eyes in amber and the strap fastening her cloak in bronze, the whole enriched with paint. Like the Salome, the Kassandra represented the heroic female type, inspired by the Antique both in subject matter and in the actual choice of materials. Kassandra expresses a mood beyond the scope of the Ancient sculptors. As with his graphic work, Klinger has disclosed an inner turmoil and sorrow not through muscular drama as in the Anitque, but rather through a frozen nervous tension. Her body is twisted in a contrapposto position, her arms though apparently relaxed are held in a firm grip by her left hand, while her right is clenched in a fist, and finally the drapery ripples nervously across her body.
The present bronze is a rare cast by Gladenbeck, authorised by Klinger, and though lacking the chromatic richness of the original, the nature of the material allows for an added tensile expression powerfully conveying Kassandra's destiny and the restraint of a tormented soul. The Kassandra stands as Klinger's most forceful image of woman and as an evocative illustration of the celebrated Greek tragedy. The complex play of the physical with the eloquence of emotion combine to form an important symbol of Klinger's sculptural oeuvre.
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