LEIGH, Dorothy. The Mothers Blessing: Or, The godly Counsaile of a Gentle-woman, not long since deceased. London: for John Budge, '16017' [1607]. 12° (123 x 74mm). (Title lightly soiled, last leaf rehinged.) Contemporary limp vellum (lacking ties, soiled). Provenance: George Goyder (bookplate, acquired Sotheby's 19th February 1945, ownership insciptions). Third edition. STC 15402.5 (citing this copy only).

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LEIGH, Dorothy. The Mothers Blessing: Or, The godly Counsaile of a Gentle-woman, not long since deceased. London: for John Budge, '16017' [1607]. 12° (123 x 74mm). (Title lightly soiled, last leaf rehinged.) Contemporary limp vellum (lacking ties, soiled). Provenance: George Goyder (bookplate, acquired Sotheby's 19th February 1945, ownership insciptions). Third edition. STC 15402.5 (citing this copy only).

[Lancelot ANDREWES (1555-1626)]. A Patterne of Catechisticall Doctrine. London: for William Garret, 1630. 12° (140 x 81mm). (Small rust-hole in 22 affecting two letters, X5 trimmed due to printing error.) Modern tan panelled calf, spine gilt in compartments. Provenance: a few neat early annotations; George Goyder (bookplate, and ownership incsription). Third edition. STC 603.5.

John JEWELL (1522-1571). The Apology of the Church of England. London: John Beale, 1635. 12° (120 x 66mm). (Title trimmed affecting typographical border, slight marginal worming at end.) Later tree calf, flat spine gilt with lettering-piece (rubbed at extremities, hinges cracked). Provenance: Bache Matthews (bookplate and ownership inscription dated 1910); George Goyder (bookplate). STC 14593 (citing 7 copies including this copy).

EPICURUS (ca. 341-270 B.C.). Epicurus's Morals. English translation by Walter Charleton. London: W.Wilson for Henry Herringmen, 1656. 4° (180 x 140mm). Title in red and black, e2 folded, engraved portrait frontispiece. (Some old dampstaining.) Contemporary blind-tooled sheep. Provenance: ?Willsnant (contemporary ownership inscription on title); George Goyder (armorial bookplate). A FINE COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION IN ENGLISH. Epicurus, far from advocating over-indulgence, held that the chief good in life was the simple pleasure arising from the "freedom of the body from pain and the soul from anxiety.2 Wing E-3155. (4)
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