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A MAHOGANY AND SATINWOOD OPEN ARMCHAIR, the pierced channelled interlaced shield-shaped splat centred by ribbon-tied Prince-of-Wales feathers above swagged drapery, the out-scrolled channelled arms with husk-trails, the padded seat covered in ivory floral silk with pinks and yellows, on patera-headed channelled square tapering legs

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A MAHOGANY AND SATINWOOD OPEN ARMCHAIR, the pierced channelled interlaced shield-shaped splat centred by ribbon-tied Prince-of-Wales feathers above swagged drapery, the out-scrolled channelled arms with husk-trails, the padded seat covered in ivory floral silk with pinks and yellows, on patera-headed channelled square tapering legs

Lot Essay

The elegant antique shield chair-back appears to have been introduced to furniture design in the 1770's by the architect James Wyatt (d. 1813). It is here coupled to the Prince of Wales' ostrich feather badge which was popularised by A. Hepplewhite and Co.'s Cabinet-Maker and Upholsterer's Guide, 1788. The pattern is discussed by John Cornforth in Country Life, 18 February 1993, p. 49, with reference to a painted chair-back board, that is now in the Victoria & Albert Museum. A closely related armchair in the Museum's collection, also features the veil-drapery tied to the arms, and relates to a design, after Hepplewhite, illustrated in the 1788 sketch-book of Messrs. Gillow of London and Lancaster (see M. Tomlin, Catalogue of Adam Period Furniture, London, 1982, p. 5
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