Details
A GEORGE III SILVER URN AND COVER
MAKER'S MARK OF PAUL STORR, LONDON, 1806, SPIGOT REMOVED

Circular, on square pedestal with four paw and scroll feet headed by palmette, with gadrooned circular base, the part-fluted body with crenellated rim and two ribbon-tied reeded handles issuing from lion's masks, the part-fluted domed cover with bands of ovolo and with bud finial, the sides applied with a coat-of-arms and crest with drapery mantling, marked under base and on cover
15½in. (39.3cm.) high
(154oz., 4795gr.)

Lot Essay

The arms are those of Charles Thellusson, M.P. for Evesham, 3rd son of Peter Thellusson Esq., whose will was the subject of the celebrated Thellusson case, and younger brother of the 1st Baron Rendlesham, impaling those of his wife Sabine, eldest daughter of Abraham Robarts Esq., whom he married in 1795. By his father's will, dated 2nd April, 1796, Charles and his brothers were excluded from the major part of their father's estate, valued at /p600,000 to /p800,000, which was assigned to a trust to accumulate during the lives of his sons, and sons' sons, and their issue at the time of his death. On the death of the last survivor the estate was to be equally divided among the eldest male lineal descendants of his three sons then living. The family attempted to set the will aside, but the Lord Chancellor announced the will valid in 1799. As it was calculated that the accumulation might reach /p140,000,000 the will was regarded by some as a danger to the country and an act was passed in 1800 prohibiting similar bequests. Through mismanagement and the costs of litigation the final distribution, ordered by the House of Lords in 1859, was comparatively moderate and was divided between Frederick WIlliam Brook Thellusson, Lord Rendlesham, and Charles Sabine Augustus, grandson of the Charles whose arms appear on the present lot.
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