FITZGERALD, F. SCOTT. Autograph letter signed ("F Scott Fitzgerald") to "Dear Tom" (Thomas R. Smith, an editor at Boni & Liveright), Great Neck, L.I., n.d. [c. 1923]. 1 page, 4to, in brown ink, traces of tape on verso from previous mounting, show-through from verso of a long scratch; half morocco slipcase.

Details
FITZGERALD, F. SCOTT. Autograph letter signed ("F Scott Fitzgerald") to "Dear Tom" (Thomas R. Smith, an editor at Boni & Liveright), Great Neck, L.I., n.d. [c. 1923]. 1 page, 4to, in brown ink, traces of tape on verso from previous mounting, show-through from verso of a long scratch; half morocco slipcase.

FITZGERALD CHAMPIONS GERTRUDE STEIN, CASTIGATES WALDO FRANK

Smith, who hoped to woo Fitzgerald away from Scribner's, had sent him several new Boni & Liveright books. At the time Fitzgerald was living on the North Shore of Long Island, working on The Great Gatsby.. "...The Waldo Frank novel is I'm afraid just his usual canned rubbish. He seems to be an ambitious but totally uninspired person under the delusion that by filching the most advanced methods from the writers who originated them to express the moods of their definate [sic] personalities, he can supply a substitute for his own lack of feeling and cover up the bogus 'arty-ness' of his work. He strains for a simile until his belly aches and brings up a mess of overworked words...His horror of the cliche is entirely Freudian...a man incapable of the disassociation of ideas can never think in any words except those that are immortally paired...I'm afraid Horace [Liveright] has made a bad guess on him. I wish to God you'd republish Gertrude Stein's Three Lives and expose some of these jokers. Her book is utterly real. It's in her early manner before the attempt to transfer the technique of Mattisse [sic] & Picasso to prose made her coo-coo..." (Three Lives was reissued in America in 1927 by Albert & Charles Boni.). Published in Letters, ed. M.J. Bruccoli and M.M. Duggan, p. 123.