Karl Friedrich von Schinkel (1781-1842)
MASTER DRAWINGS FROM THE MARTIN BODMER FOUNDATION
Karl Friedrich von Schinkel (1781-1842)

A design for a new stairwell for the North façade of the Schloss at Stettin, with a subsidiary study of the loggia, a cross-section of the façade, and an engaged pilaster

Details
Karl Friedrich von Schinkel (1781-1842)
A design for a new stairwell for the North façade of the Schloss at Stettin, with a subsidiary study of the loggia, a cross-section of the façade, and an engaged pilaster
signed 'Schinkel' and inscribed 'Nach deer Entwurfe seiner Königlichen Hoheit des Kronprinzen zu bemerken ist, dass am Schlosse an einem Theile schon die Säule verkommt zwichen den arkaden und nach dieser wird die obize Architectur genau gemodelt' and 'Architectur des Treppenhauses', and with a scale
pencil, pen and black and brown ink, watercolour, some compass indications
8 3/8 x 11¼ in. (212 x 287 mm.)
Provenance
Architekt Hermann Wille.
Purchased from C.G. Boerner, Dusseldorf, February 1970, no. 81.
Literature
H. Vogel, Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Lebenswerk, 7: Pommern, Berlin, 1952, p. 28, fig. 31.

Lot Essay

Schinkel designed the Fürstentreppe (Prince's Staircase) for the Schloss at Stettin, now Szezecin in Western Poland, in 1840. The alterations to the garden façade of the Schloss, formerly the residence of the Dukes of Pomerania, were intended to give separate access to the new reception rooms built for Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, later King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia, and the Royal family. The initial conception, as the autograph note on the current lot indicates, came from a sketch by the Crown Prince himself, now in the Staatsarchiv, Berlin, H. Vogel, op. cit., p. 29, fig. 32. In order to harmonize the new two-storey structure with the older building, Schinkel modelled his loggia on existing arcades on the northern and western sides of the Schloss's inner courtyard. The staircase was built in 1841-2.
We are grateful for Professor Dr. Peter Betthausen's assistance in cataloguing this lot. Professor Betthausen notes that the drawing may have been intended for presentation to the Crown Prince.
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