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A RENNAISANCE REVIVAL GILDED, CARVED AND INLAID EBONIZED CABINET
A RENNAISANCE REVIVAL GILDED, CARVED AND INLAID EBONIZED CABINET

ATTRIBUTED TO HERTER BROTHERS (W.1863-1912), NEW YORK CITY, CIRCA 1870-1873

Details
A RENNAISANCE REVIVAL GILDED, CARVED AND INLAID EBONIZED CABINET
Attributed to Herter Brothers (w.1863-1912), New York City, circa 1870-1873
The central raised rectangular outstepped section with molded stepped top with gilded incised floral and geometric repeating design above an inlayed drawer front of sphinxes and lion heads over a paneled door centering a painted woman holding cut wheat above a cherub with a schythe, flanked by floral gilt incised designs in upper corners, all further flanked by inscised and gilded pilasters headed by carved capitals, above a repeating floral and geometric gilt incised band, all flanked by semicircular ends with similar inlayed drawers with carved and gilded animal head pulls above glass doors opening to reveal a shelved interior, over similar gilt incised bands, each with a similar pilaster at each end, all on carved and parcel gilt ball-and-claw feet headed by carved acanthus leaves, the shelves and top lined with purple velvet
41½in. high, 53½in. wide, 22½in. deep
Provenance
Margot Johnson, New York, New York
Post Lot Text
END OF SALE

Lot Essay

Through the use of high quality materials, an unmatched level of workmanship and a remarkable and recognizable form, Herter Brothers has created in this demilune cabinet a whimsical yet formal and architectural cabinet. Though not signed, this cabinet is typical of both the signed and attributed objects that comprise the best of the company's work. A very similar unmarked demilune cabinet is illustrated in Howe, Herter Brothers: Furniture and Interiors for a Gilded Age (Houston: Abrams), fig. 15, p. 156. Given the identical decorative inlaid griffins, column treatments, drawer pulls and carved and gilded ball-and-claw feet, these cabinets were probably made at about the same time. The only differences between the cabinets is the treatment of the doors. The cabinet in private collection has doors which are painted with an architectural scene, while the one offered here has a central door painted with a classical figure of a woman with a cherub, and the side doors are glass. Another similar example, of this demilune cabinet form but with marquetry, is illustrated in Howe, fig. 104.
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