A TULA-STYLE ORMOLU AND POLISHED STEEL FIREPLACE
No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VA… Read more THE PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTOR This magnificent jewel-like table is undoubtedly one of the finest examples of ornamental 'Tulaware', named after the Imperial Arms factory which was founded at Tula by Peter the Great in 1712. The Imperial armoury became the centre of the Russian arms production and supplied weapons to the Russian forces during the war against Sweden. However, by about 1730 not only military hunting weapons but also decorative objects including caskets, folding chairs and tables were being made with the techniques associated with gun-making like chasing, blueing and overlay. During the reign of Empress Catherine II a new technique was perfected by which metal was cut and polished in facets like diamonds, often combined with silver inlays and ormolu mounts (see A. Chenevière, Russian Furniture, The Golden Age 1780-1840, London, 1988, pp. 245-246).
A TULA-STYLE ORMOLU AND POLISHED STEEL FIREPLACE

20TH CENTURY

Details
A TULA-STYLE ORMOLU AND POLISHED STEEL FIREPLACE
20th Century
Decorated overall with spirally twisted beading and facetted rosettes and crowns, the rectangular inverted breakfront top with a protruding centre above a stepped cornice and a panelled frieze and pilasters around the bevelled fire opening
50,1/2 in. (128 cm.) high; 63 in. (160 cm.) wide; 14½ in. (37 cm.) deep
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis

Lot Essay

The design of this splendid chimneypiece is based on the Tula chimneypiece in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (M. Campbell, Decorative Ironwork, London, 1997, p. 74, fig 115), which is a fine example of ornamental 'Tulaware', named after the Imperial Arms factory which was founded at Tula by Peter the Great in 1712. The Imperial armoury became the centre of the Russian arms production and supplied weapons to the Russian forces during the war against Sweden. However, by about 1730 not only military hunting weapons but also decorative objects including caskets, folding chairs and tables were being made with the techniques associated with gun-making like chasing, blueing and overlay. During the reign of Empress Catherine II a new technique was perfected by which metal was cut and polished in facets like diamonds, often combined with silver inlays and ormolu mounts see A. Chenevière, Russian Furniture, The Golden Age 1780-1840, London, 1988, pp. 245-246).
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