A RARE YIXING PEWTER-ENCASED TEAPOT
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A RARE YIXING PEWTER-ENCASED TEAPOT

WITH IMPRESSED YANG PENGNIAN ZHI FOUR-CHARACTER POTTER'S MARK IN THE INTERIOR, AND CYCLICAL DATE DINGHAI CORRESPONDING TO AD 1827

Details
A RARE YIXING PEWTER-ENCASED TEAPOT
With impressed Yang Pengnian zhi four-character potter's mark in the interior, and cyclical date dinghai corresponding to AD 1827
Of crescent shape, with cabriole spout and silver-inlaid hongmu handle, the conforming cover with a jade loop finial, one side of the body lightly incised with a blossoming prunus branch, the other with an incription in running script, the handle inlaid in silver with seal script characters, the base of the interior with an impressed maker's seal mark
6 in. (15.2 cm.) long
Special notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 17.5% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis

Lot Essay

The four-character silver-inlaid mark reads Ruyatang zhi, 'made by Ruyatang'. Ruyatang is very probably a studio name.

Pewter-encased Yixing teapots appear to have been invented by scholar-connoiseur Zhu Jian in the early 19th century, and Yang Pengnian was one of the finest makers of these pots at the time. These teapots inherited the simple and bold geometric shapes unique to Yixing pottery and effectively combined different materials such as pewter, jade and wood. The elegantly engraved calligraphic inscription and flower painting emphasised its association with the literati class, whose patronage during this period greatly elevated the status of Yixing teapots.

Compare the related pewter-encased examples of trapezoidal and oval shape with jade finials, handles and spouts included in the exhibition Yixing Purple Clay Wares from the K.S. Lo Collection at Flagstaff House Museum of Tea Ware, Hong Kong, 1994, nos. 43 to 45; and another example in the Victoria and Albert Museum illustrated in Rare Marks on Chinese Porcelain, Percival David Foundation, London, 1998, p.132, no.56
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