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A SULTANATE POTTERY TILE ARCH
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A SULTANATE POTTERY TILE ARCH

MULTAN DISTRICT, LATE 15TH CENTURY

Details
A SULTANATE POTTERY TILE ARCH
MULTAN DISTRICT, LATE 15TH CENTURY
Each spandrel comprising three shaped tiles, each painted in cobalt-blue and turquoise with a hexagonal lattice enclosing further hexagonal motifs, each hexagon divided by cobalt-blue triangular panels, plain cobalt blue stripe border, one tile restored, minor further restorations, mounted framed and glazed
24¾ x 47½in. (63 x 121cm.)
Special Notice

VAT rate of 17.5% is payable on hammer price plus buyer’s premium

Lot Essay

This spandrel is reputed to come from the tomb of a Sufi family dated to 1480 near Multan in present day Pakistan. The mihrab panel from this mosque is in the Linden Museum, Stuttgart (Kalter, Johannes: Linden-Museum Stuttgart, Abteilungsführer Islamischer Orient, Stuttgart, 1987, pl.32, p.39). The decoration on the lower corner tiles of the mihrab and on the present arch is almost identical. Other tiles from the same source are in the Los Angles County Museum of Art, in the David Collection where they are dated "15th century or later" (Folsach, Kjeld v.: Art from the World of Islam in the david Collection, Copenhagen, 2001, no.291, p.197) and in the Keir Collection (Robinson, B.W. et at.: Islamic Art in the Keir Collection, London, 1988, no.C91, p.232 and pl.52, p.270).

Similar tiles worked with a hexagonal lattive can be seen in situ at the 15th century mausoleum of Baha al-Din Halim in Uch Sharif, 80 miles south of Multan (Clévenot, Dominique and Degeorge, Gérard: Ornament and decoration in Islamic Architecture, London, 2000, pl.281, pp.194-5).
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