The Origins of Cyberspace collection described as lots 1-255 will first be offered as a single lot, subject to a reserve price. If this price is not reached, the collection will be immediately offered as individual lots as described in the catalogue as lots 1-255.
SHOCKLEY, William (1910-1989). Electrons and holes in semiconductors. With application to transistor electronics. New York: Van Nostrand, [1950].

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SHOCKLEY, William (1910-1989). Electrons and holes in semiconductors. With application to transistor electronics. New York: Van Nostrand, [1950].

4o. Frontispiece and text illustrations. Original blue cloth.

FIRST EDITION OF THE FIRST BOOK ON TRANSISTOR ELECTRONICS. The germanium transfer resistance unit (later called the transistor) was invented in 1947 by Shockley and his colleagues John Bardeen and Walter H. Brattain, who shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in physics for their achievement. The transistor was thus available in the very early days of the computer era, but several technological problems had to be solved before transistors could be employed on a large scale in computer construction. In 1958 the Philco Corporation came out with the Transac S-2000, the first commercially produced computer to employ high-speed transistors; this was followed shortly afterward by transistor-based computers from UNIVAC and IBM. "As faster and faster transistor-based machines were being produced, the slowness of peripheral devices such as card readers and line printers was felt as an impediment to the overall processing speed of the system. This led in 1960 to the development of separate, stand-alone computers such as the [IBM] 1401... As more and more jobs were assigned to these smaller machines, a whole separate line of machines came into being..." (Williams, A History of Computing Technology [1985], 392--3). OOC 904.
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