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VERRUË, Jeanne-Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes, comtesse de (1670-1736) -- Gabriel MARTIN (1679-1761). Catalogue des livres de feue Madame la Comtesse de Verruë, dont la vente se fera en détail en son Hôtel. Paris: G. Martin, 1737.
VERRUË, Jeanne-Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes, comtesse de (1670-1736) -- Gabriel MARTIN (1679-1761). Catalogue des livres de feue Madame la Comtesse de Verruë, dont la vente se fera en détail en son Hôtel. Paris: G. Martin, 1737.

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VERRUË, Jeanne-Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes, comtesse de (1670-1736) -- Gabriel MARTIN (1679-1761). Catalogue des livres de feue Madame la Comtesse de Verruë, dont la vente se fera en détail en son Hôtel. Paris: G. Martin, 1737.

8o (188 x 118 mm). With the very rare ephemeral notice of the dates and order of the continuation of the sale (29-31 July) inserted. Woodcut of the Verruë-Luynes arms on title. Dark-green hard-grain half morocco over marbled boards of the third quarter of the 19th century, gilt coronetted monogram of the Goncourt brothers in compartments of spine, marbled endpapers and leaf-edges. Provenance: Edmond de Goncourt (1822-96), art critic and littérateur, with his brother Jules author of La femme au dix-huitième siècle 1862; a full page of autograph notes in his characteristic red ink on flyleaf, concerning Mme de Verruë, and the prices and buyers marked by him on the first 68 pages.

EXCEPTIONAL ASSOCIATION COPY of the rare sale catalogue of Mme de Verruë's library. Edmond de Goncourt will have studied his Verruë catalogue just as the brothers were writing their most influential work, that on women in the 18th century: "La femme, au dix-huitième siècle, est le principe qui gouverne, la raison qui dirige, la voix qui commande... Les lettres, les arts, les modes du dix-huitième siècle aussi bien que des destinées, elle les porte dans sa robe, elle les plie à son caprice ou à ses passions."

Jeanne de Luynes married the Comte de Verruë when she was thirteen. Two years later, he presented her at the court of Victor-Amédée, Duke of Savoie, who took her as his mistress, but soon she fled Turin for Paris where she held a salon for the most eminent of the capital's society. Her collections of pictures, sculpture, furniture and porcelain were considered unsurpassed, but Guigard called her library especially remarkable, "un diamant serti d'or" (Armorial du Bibliophile II, 234). The duc de La Vallière bought most of the drama in the sale and much besides, all now preserved at the Arsenal Library, Paris. Pollard and Ehrman 275; North 44.
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