Quare & Horseman. A very fine 18K gold repoussé quarter repeating pair case verge watch
On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial int… Read more
Quare & Horseman. A very fine 18K gold repoussé quarter repeating pair case verge watch

SIGNED D. QUARE & S. HORSEMAN, LONDON, NO. 1157, CIRCA 1720

Details
Quare & Horseman. A very fine 18K gold repoussé quarter repeating pair case verge watch
Signed D. Quare & S. Horseman, London, No. 1157, circa 1720
With gilt-finished verge movement, chain fusée, finely engraved and pierced gilt-finished scroll decorated balance cock and foot, plain three-arm brass balance, repeating on two hammers onto a bell, gilt dust cover, the later white enamel dial with Roman numerals, outer Arabic five minute divisions, gilt beetle and poker hands, the inner case with finely engraved and pierced scroll and foliage decorated band, silent repeat push-piece underneath the blank bezel, repeating through the pendant, the outer case with finely chased, pierced and embossed scroll and foliage decorated bezel, the reverse centred by a chased and embossed mythological scene in high relief surrounded by the portraits of two ladies and two gentlemen, case stamped with casemaker's initials WI and numbered 1157, dust cover and movement signed and numbered
51 mm. diam.
Special notice

On occasion, Christie's has a direct financial interest in lots consigned for sale. This interest may include guaranteeing a minimum price to the consignor of property or making an advance to the consignor which is secured solely by consigned property. Such property is offered subject to a reserve. This is such a lot.

Lot Essay

Daniel Quare, probably born in Somerset around 1647/48, was one of the most prominent watch and clock makers to George I and the inventor of the repeating watch. He established himself at St. Martin Le Grand in London and became a Brother in the Clockmakers' Company in 1671 and Master in 1708.

After Quare's death in 1724, the business was continued by Stephen Horseman whom he had taken as an apprentice in 1702 and into partnership in 1705.

The present watch is fitted with a sourdine or 'deaf piece', a device which appears to have been invented by George Graham. Upon depressing, this silent repeat push-piece keeps the hammer off the bell and each blow can be felt by the finger. It not only enables those who have defective hearing or sight to tell the time by touch but also allows one to consult the watch without disturbing anyone.
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