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EISENHOWER, Dwight D. (1890-1969), Supreme Commander, President. Portrait photograph of Eisenhower as Supreme Commander, inscribed and signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower  General U.S. Army") as a full General, [London, England], inscribed 14 June 1943. 8 7/8 x 6 9/16 in., a fine-quality print on heavy stock, inscribed in ink in lower portion. Showing a resolute Ike, against a backdrop of an American flag, with his four stars and theater ribbons clearly depicted.
EISENHOWER, Dwight D. (1890-1969), Supreme Commander, President. Portrait photograph of Eisenhower as Supreme Commander, inscribed and signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower General U.S. Army") as a full General, [London, England], inscribed 14 June 1943. 8 7/8 x 6 9/16 in., a fine-quality print on heavy stock, inscribed in ink in lower portion. Showing a resolute Ike, against a backdrop of an American flag, with his four stars and theater ribbons clearly depicted.

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EISENHOWER, Dwight D. (1890-1969), Supreme Commander, President. Portrait photograph of Eisenhower as Supreme Commander, inscribed and signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower General U.S. Army") as a full General, [London, England], inscribed 14 June 1943. 8 7/8 x 6 9/16 in., a fine-quality print on heavy stock, inscribed in ink in lower portion. Showing a resolute Ike, against a backdrop of an American flag, with his four stars and theater ribbons clearly depicted.

WARMLY INSCRIBED BY THE SUPREME COMMANDER TO KAY SUMMERSBY, HIS DRIVER

Inscribed in fountain pen: "To Kay, one of the best soldiers I have ever been fortunate enough to have in my command. Dwight D. Eisenhower, General, U.S. Army, June 14, 1943." A seldom-reproduced portrait of Eisenhower, promoted to full General in February 1943 and in December named Supreme Allied Commander, charged with the invasion of Hitler's "Festung Europa," launched just over a year after he inscribed this photograph. The Irish-born Kay Summersby (later Morgan) had been assigned as a driver to General Mark Clark and Eisenhower on an early visit to London, and Ike later requested Summersby serve as his personal driver. A vivacious 24-year-old, she joined the Women's Army Corps and rose from driver to personal secretary and aide to Eisenhower. During the war, there was considerable gossip about Summersby and Ike, and the controversy surfaced publicly in 1974, with publication of Merle Miller's Plain Speaking: An Oral Biography of Harry S. Truman, in which Truman recalled that at the end of the war, Eisenhower had asked General Goerge C. Marshall to post him to the U.S. to divorce Mamie and marry "an English girl." According to Truman, Marshall was adamantly opposed and wrote in strong terms, denying Ike's request. In Summersby's own memoir, Past Forgetting: My Love Affair With Dwight D. Eisenhower (New York, 1976), after Ike's death, she frankly avowed an affair, although unconsummated. As one recent biographer writes, "the nature of their relationship was probably less than she claimed, but more than he acknowledged" (G. Perret, Eisenhower, 1999).

Provenance: The Estate of Kay Summersby Morgan, (sale, Sotheby's, 13 June 1991, lot 161).
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