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A very large Rudolstadt-Volkstedt porcelain 'dining room' armorial lace group
Christie's charge a premium to the buyer on the fi… Read more SUGARY SCULPTURE FOR THE DESSERT It may be amazing and a great surprise to many that the porcelain figures and groups we are familiar with today had their origin in table decorations in wax and sugar paste. These had been produced from medieval times for grand wedding feasts and especially Germany had a strong tradition of creating very elaborate tableaux in which confectionery figures were combined with architectural features in landscape settings. Although ephemeral, the finest work demanded great skill, and some sugar paste sculptures were produced by the best artists. Meissen was the first factory to make 'sugary' table decorations in the more durable and reusable and of course efficient material of porcelain. Meissen's sets of small figures were made in great quantity and were extensively copied and translated elsewhere. The 'sugary' figures were often set out among elaborate parterres made out of mousseline, marzipan or pasteboard filled with coloured sugar or sand. THE 'SUGARY' FIGURES COLLECTION OF A BELGIAN LADY (LOTS 208-227)
A very large Rudolstadt-Volkstedt porcelain 'dining room' armorial lace group

EARLY 20TH CENTURY, BLUE CROWNED MONOGRAM MARK

Details
A very large Rudolstadt-Volkstedt porcelain 'dining room' armorial lace group
EARLY 20TH CENTURY, BLUE CROWNED MONOGRAM MARK
Modelled as a large oval dinner table surrounded by ten aristocratic figures, on scrolled oval base enhanced by a coat-of-arms (restored)
49 cm. high and 72 cm. wide
Special notice

Christie's charge a premium to the buyer on the final bid price of each lot sold at the following rates: 23.8% of the final bid price of each lot sold up to and including €150,000 and 14.28% of any amount in excess of €150,000. Buyers' premium is calculated on the basis of each lot individually.

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