**A FINE AND RARE WHITE JADE SNUFF BOTTLE
Prospective purchasers are advised that several co… Read more
**A FINE AND RARE WHITE JADE SNUFF BOTTLE

PROBABLY IMPERIAL, ATTRIBUTED TO THE PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, 1736-1795

Details
**A FINE AND RARE WHITE JADE SNUFF BOTTLE
PROBABLY IMPERIAL, ATTRIBUTED TO THE PALACE WORKSHOPS, BEIJING, 1736-1795
Of compressed spherical form beneath a tall, slightly flaring neck, the lower half carved with a continuous design of formalized lotus petals, the base encircled by stylized lingzhi heads with raised, central bosses, the shoulder with a band of simulated rope, the well-hollowed stone of flawless creamy white tone, coral stopper
1 13/16 in. (4.5 cm.) high
Provenance
Hugh M. Moss Ltd. (Hong Kong, 1983)
Literature
100 Selected Chinese Snuff Bottles from the J & J Collection, no. 100
J & J poster
JICSBS, Autumn 1989, front cover
Moss et. al., The Art of the Chinese Snuff Bottle, The J & J Collection, vol. 1, no. 35
Exhibited
Christie's, London, October 1987
Christie's, New York, 1993
Empress Place Museum, Singapore, 1994
Museum fur Kunsthandwerk, Frankfurt, 1996-1997
Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art, London, 1997
Naples Museum of Art, Florida, 2002
Portland Museum of Art, Oregon, 2002
National Museum of History, Taipei, 2002
International Asian Art Fair, Seventh Regiment Armory, New York, 2003
Poly Art Museum, Beijing, 2003
Special notice

Prospective purchasers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to coral, ivory and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective purchasers should familiarize themselves with relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import this lot into another country.

Lot Essay

From the early Qianlong period onwards, the Emperor's passion for jade prompted a massive Imperial output of art works in the material, including snuff bottles. The Qianlong Emperor was also deeply conscious of his Manchu ancestry and the need to claim credibility in the eyes of the native Han Chinese he ruled. As such he vehemently embraced the ancient arts of China by collecting vast quantities of ancient bronzes, jades, ceramics and other wares, and by incorporating archaistic designs into contemporary works. This archaistic penchant is typical of the Palace workshops, and with the present bottle the simulated rope design is derived from bronze vessels of the Zhou and early Han periods, many of which were in the Imperial Collection by the eighteenth century. This archaistic element combined with the choice of flawless material, the refined and understated taste, the perfectly controlled carving and the characteristically wide mouth and flat upper rim surrounding the lip, all support a confident attribution to the Beijing Palace workshops.

The distinctive formalized lotus-petal design, which terminates at the base in a lingzhi-derived pattern and incorporates bosses as part of the design, would appear to relate stylistically to a Qianlong-marked white and grey jade bottle from the J & J Collection, illustrated by Moss et. al., The Art of the Chinese Snuff Bottle, vol. 1, no. 34.
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