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A DUTCH GILT-BRASS MOUNTED BLACK, RED AND GILT LACQUER SATINWOOD, ROSEWOOD, TULIPWOOD, AMARANTH AND FRUITWOOD MARQUETRY SIDEBOARD
Christie's charge a premium to the buyer on the fi… Read more
A DUTCH GILT-BRASS MOUNTED BLACK, RED AND GILT LACQUER SATINWOOD, ROSEWOOD, TULIPWOOD, AMARANTH AND FRUITWOOD MARQUETRY SIDEBOARD

CIRCA 1780-1795

Details
A DUTCH GILT-BRASS MOUNTED BLACK, RED AND GILT LACQUER SATINWOOD, ROSEWOOD, TULIPWOOD, AMARANTH AND FRUITWOOD MARQUETRY SIDEBOARD
CIRCA 1780-1795
Crossbanded and banded overall, the canted moulded Bleu Turquin marble top above a pair of doors each centred by a panel decorated with a stylized landscape with flowers and a crane, suspended from a ribbon-tie and flanked and divided by ribbon-and-stick marquetry panels, enclosing an interior with one incurved shelf, each side decorated with a red lacquer panel with a large peony, the doors and sides with probabaly Battersea English white and black enamel handles, on square tapering legs with brass toupie feet
97 cm. high x 134 cm. wide x 56 cm. deep
Provenance
With Aronson, acquired by the present owner in 2000
Special Notice

Christie's charge a premium to the buyer on the final bid price of each lot sold at the following rates: 23.8% of the final bid price of each lot sold up to and including €150,000 and 14.28% of any amount in excess of €150,000. Buyers' premium is calculated on the basis of each lot individually.

Lot Essay

This elegant sideboard reflects the English influence on Dutch cabinet-making, between circa 1780-1795, when light satinwood and light exotic veneers and refined marquetry decoration became fashionable. Typically Dutch is the combination of this type of marquetry with Japanese, Chinese or imitation lacquer panels, and may have been a speciality of cabinet-makers working in The Hague, where novelties in furniture-making were often first developed. The celebrated Hague cabinet-maker Matthijs Horrix (1735-1809) was possibly responsible for the introduction of this daring new type of decoration. Horrix, who became meester kabinetwerker in 1764, was the principal supplier of furniture to the Stadtholder's Court between 1767 and 1795. He received a commission from Princess Wilhelmina of Prussia - the Stadtholder's consort who admired Horrix's work - in 1780 for '...Comodes wozu ihm Chinesisch Lackwerk geliefert', for which he received 557 florins.

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