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Ellicott. An unusual silver openface cylinder watch with regulator dial, flying 1/5ths of a second and movement stop device
Ellicott. An unusual silver openface cylinder watch with regulator dial, flying 1/5ths of a second and movement stop device

SIGNED ELLICOTT, LONDON, NO. 6615, CIRCA 1770

Details
Ellicott. An unusual silver openface cylinder watch with regulator dial, flying 1/5ths of a second and movement stop device
Signed Ellicott, London, No. 6615, circa 1770
With gilt-finished cylinder movement, chain fusée, finely pierced and engraved balance cock and foot, plain three arm steel balance, diamond endstone, the movement stopped by a sliding lever underneath the bezel, gilt metal dust cover, the white enamel regulator-style dial with outer Arabic minute division with central hand, small hour dial with Roman numerals and single hand, constant seconds, flying 1/5ths of a second, in plain inner case, silver and shagreen pinwork decorated outer protective case, movement and dust cover signed
48 mm. diam. & 57 mm. overall diam.

Lot Essay

The present watch is a fine example of John Ellicott's work, fitted with his cylinder movement and a regulator dial, placing the emphasis on the minute display as opposed to the traditional time display, an extremely rare feature to find in such an early watch.

The eminent watch and clock maker John Ellicott was born 1706, the son of "an ingenious watchmaker of great note", also called John.

He established his business in Swithin's Alley, Royal Exchange in 1728. He was the inventor of a compensation pendulum and developed the use of the cylinder escapement, invented by George Graham in 1726. Like his peer George Graham he became a member of the Royal Society for which he wrote several papers. Ellicott's work is distinguished by the excellent workmanship and can be found in museums and Royal collections throughout the world. He was appointed clockmaker to the King and designed the London Hospital clock. He died suddenly in 1772 and was succeeded by his son Edward.

For a biographical note on John Ellicott and his numbering system see Watches by Cecil Clutton & George Daniels, pp. 132 & 133.

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