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AN ITALIAN BRONZE AND MARBLE CENTRE PIECE
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AN ITALIAN BRONZE AND MARBLE CENTRE PIECE

LATE 18TH CENTURY EARLY 19TH CENTURY, AFTER THE MODEL BY PIETRO TACCA AT LEGHORN

Details
AN ITALIAN BRONZE AND MARBLE CENTRE PIECE
LATE 18TH CENTURY EARLY 19TH CENTURY, AFTER THE MODEL BY PIETRO TACCA AT LEGHORN
Surmounted by a figure of Ferdinando I, Grand Duke of Tuscany, the plinth with ormolu-mounted rosso verona marble panels, the angles each with a figure of a slave above the stepped base
29½ in. (74.9 cm.) high
Mounted on an associated Louis XIV boulle plinth, the frieze with female masks flanked by acanthus scrolls to the angles, with later applied plaque ' 1 ST GRAND DUKE OF TUSCANY, D.1609 BY PIETRO TACCA, DIED 1650 (THE ORIGINAL ERECTED NEAR THE HARBOUR OF LEGHORN)', on later Louis XV paw feet -- 7 in. (17.8 cm.) high; 17 in. (43.2 cm.) wide; 18 in. (45.7 cm.) deep
Literature
J. Mack-Andrick, Pietro Tacca - Hofbildhauer der Medici (1577-1640), Weimar, 2005, pp. 101-166, figs. 27, 30, 32-35.
Special Notice

No VAT will be charged on the hammer price, but VAT at 15% will be added to the buyer's premium which is invoiced on a VAT inclusive basis.

Lot Essay

Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany (d.1609) was Grand Duke of Tuscany from 1587 to 1609, having succeeded his older brother Francesco I. Ferdinando was the fifth son of Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Eleonora di Toledo (1519-62), the daughter of Don Pedro Alvarez de Toledo, the Spanish viceroy of Naples.

The present centrepiece is a reduction with minor variations of a monument executed in marble and bronze of Ferdinando I, Grand Duke of Tuscany, in the port of Livorno. The marble portrait of the Grand Duke was carved at the end of the 16th century by Giovanni Bandini, but the monument is perhaps best known for the four bronze slaves around the pedestal which were executed by Pietro Tacca in the early 17th century and installed by 1626. Tacca was one of the most gifted of Giambologna's assistants and after the former's death in 1608 Tacca succeeded him as court sculptor to the Medici. The Monument of the Four Slaves, as it is usually known, was one of the commissions which dominated the second half of Tacca's career.

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