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HOPE, James (1801-1841). Principles and Illustrations of Morbid Anatomy. London: Whittaker & Co., 1834.
HOPE, James (1801-1841). Principles and Illustrations of Morbid Anatomy. London: Whittaker & Co., 1834.

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HOPE, James (1801-1841). Principles and Illustrations of Morbid Anatomy. London: Whittaker & Co., 1834.

8o (255 x 154 mm). 48 hand-colored lithographed plates after drawings by Hope (some occasional light soiling). Later green cloth (rebacked preserving original spine, a few repairs). Provenance: Joseph H. Hunt (ink stamp on front free endpaper, signature on title-page, given to); Medical Society of the County of Kings (book label, ink stamp on title-page and verso of plates).

FIRST EDITION. To illustrate this treatise James Hope personally prepared 260 paintings of pathological specimens. Later he also transferred the images onto 48 lithographic stones for the reproduction of the hand-colored plates. According to the DNB, preparation of the drawings and the lithographic stones occupied Hope for 14 years. He began the project at the beginning of his medical education, and published the work after he became a physician at London's Marylebone Infirmary. Hope intended his work to provide a more portable and less expensive alternative to large folio color-plate atlases such as those of Cruveilhier and Bright, which would have been too costly for many physicians to acquire. Garrison-Morton 2289; Heirs of Hippocrates 1629; Long, History of Pathology, p. 94; Norman 1104; Wellcome III, p. 299.

[With:]

HOPE. A Treatise of Diseases of the Heart and Great Vessels and on the Affections which May be Mistaken for Them. London: John Churchill, 1839.

8o (230 x 143 mm). 16-page publisher's advertisements bound at front. 7 plates (one double-page) (some occasional spotting). Original cloth (rebacked, preserving original spine, corners bumped). Provenance: Bedford Medical Library (ink stamp on title-page and a few leaves).

Third edition, and first illustrated edition, with frontispiece and six plates after drawings by Hope. "Hope did much to advance the knowledge of heart murmurs, valvular disease, and aneurysm; he described the second sound of the left side of the sternum in mitral stenosis as 'altered'--losing its short, flat clear sound and becoming a prolonged bellows murmur. From his description this became known as 'Hope's early diastolic murmur'" (Garrison-Morton 2747, first edition 1832). (2)

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