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A MID-VICTORIAN MAHOGANY SIDE TABLE
A MID-VICTORIAN MAHOGANY SIDE TABLE

OF GEORGE II STYLE, CIRCA 1870

Details
A MID-VICTORIAN MAHOGANY SIDE TABLE
OF GEORGE II STYLE, CIRCA 1870
The serpentina rossa di Levanto brecciata marble rectangular top with reeded and concave-molded edge on all four sides, above a foliage-carved edge and plain frieze with ribbon-and-rosette border, above a deep carved pierced apron with central acanthus and fruit swags, on acanthus-carved cabriole front legs formed as the crest of a lion head in a tower, with scrolled feet
40¼ in. (102 cm.) high; 65¼ in. (166 cm.) wide, 32½ in. (82.5 cm.) deep
Provenance
Supplied to the Sheppard family, Campsea Ashe, Suffolk, circa 1870. Bought with the house by The Hon. William Lowther (1821-1912) in 1883 and by descent to his son
James Lowther, 1st Viscount Ullswater (1855-1949), Campsea Ashe; sold by his Executors, Garrod, Turner & Son auctioneers house sale, 24-31 October 1949, lot 1121 ('Irish Chippendale side table' located in the dining-room).

Lot Essay

The heraldically-charged sideboard-table, designed in the George II 'Roman' fashion, has its marble top supported on an acanthus-enriched frame that is garlanded by fruit and flowers. Palms issue from its truss-voluted legs beside heraldic lion heads issuing from towers. Legs similarly charged with crests feature on George II tables that have been identified with John, 2nd Duke of Montague (d. 1749) (P. Macquoid, English Furniture, Tapestry and Needlework of the XVIth - XIXth Centuries, London, 1928, p. 68, pl. 68).

CAMPSEA ASHE
Campsea Ashe High House was a late 16th century house that was enlarged in the early 18th century when the wings and a grand marble entrance or 'banqueting' hall were added. The house was remodelled by Anthony Salvin (1799-1881) circa 1870 using much of the original structure and interior. This table is likely to have been commissioned then, incorporating the family crest of the Sheppard family (a lion's head, sa., issuing from a tower, or.) who had owned the estate since 1648. The house and estate were purchased in 1883 by the Hon. William Lowther (younger brother of the 3rd Earl of Lonsdale), who no doubt purchased some of the contents at the same time. William Lowther later rebuilt the house in the Tudor style and the table was among the items sold following the death of his son, the 1st Viscount Ullswater. It was located in the dining room at the time of the sale in 1949.

A pair of walnut and parcel-gilt double-chairback settees from Campsea Ashe was sold anonymously, Christie's, London, 28 November 2002, lot 50. A chimneypiece from the Georgian Campsea Ashe was sold anonymously, Christie's, London, 4 March 2004, lot 231.

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