AN INDIAN IVORY, SADELI MOSAIC AND CARVED SANDALWOOD SECRETAIRE
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AN INDIAN IVORY, SADELI MOSAIC AND CARVED SANDALWOOD SECRETAIRE

SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY, BOMBAY PRESIDENCY

Details
AN INDIAN IVORY, SADELI MOSAIC AND CARVED SANDALWOOD SECRETAIRE
SECOND HALF 19TH CENTURY, BOMBAY PRESIDENCY
Decorated overall with inlaid geometric mosaic motifs, the temple-form pediment with domed finials, above a pair of doors with carved panels depicting birds amid foliage, enclosing three waved letter slots with divides, above a single drawer, flanked by four drawers with carved foliate panels and a pair of canted ivory columns, above a hinged fall-front lined with purple velvet enclosing a conforming flap and a well with two simulated drawers, the sides each with a simulated drawer, the base with a pair of panelled doors enclosing two drawers, the upper a fitted sewing drawer, the lower a purple velvet-lined drawer fitted for medals or jewellrey, flanked by canted columns enclosing a platform with arched corners, the sides each with five drawers, on brass bun feet, with Lever locks stamped 'V' and 'R' on either side of a crown
53½ in. (136 cm.) high; 25¾ in. (65.5 cm.) wide; 12½ in. (32 cm.) deep
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 15% on the buyer's premium

Lot Essay

The method of veneering sadeli mosaic involves the binding together of geometrically-shaped rods, each about two feet in length, of various materials, sometimes including horn, tin, ivory, stained ivory, sappan wood and ebony. They are arranged geometrically and then sliced through transversely and arranged into sheets of repeating patterns which are then glued onto the carcase. The main centre of production in India was Bombay and its district, the earliest known pieces appear to have been produced in the first decade of the 19th century. Commonly produced items veneered in sadeli were small, portable boxes, writing-cases, ink-stands, letter-openers, picture-frames and other such curios, although chairs and gaming-tables are known [see below] (A. Jaffer, Furniture from British India and Ceylon, London, 2001, p. 313, cf. nos. 128-131, 134-139, 143-149).

A sadeli mosaic and pewter-inlaid ivory games-table was sold anonymously, in these Rooms, 5 April 2001, lot 216 (24,675).
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