Charles Webster Hawthorne (1872-1930)
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Charles Webster Hawthorne (1872-1930)

Impressionist Figure

Details
Charles Webster Hawthorne (1872-1930)
Impressionist Figure
signed 'CHawthorne' (lower left)
oil on canvas
36 x 32 in. (91.4 x 81.3 cm.)
Provenance
Kennedy Galleries, New York.
The Elaine Horwith Gallery, New York.
Coe Kerr Gallery, New York.
Grand Central Art Galleries, New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Haig Tashjian, New York.
Sotheby's, New York, 25 May 1988, lot 43.
Acquired by the present owner from the above.
Literature
Parrish Art Museum, American Realist and Impressionist Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Haig Tashjian, exhibition catalogue, New York, 1983, p. 60, fig. 5, illustrated.
J.A. Hardin and V.A. Leeds, In the American Spirit: Realism and Impressionism from the Lawrence Collection, exhibition catalogue, St. Petersburg, Florida, 1999, pp. 30, 57, 84, no. 18, illustrated (as Lady in a Chair).
Exhibited
Greenvale, New York, C.W. Post Art Gallery, and elsewhere, Madame in Her Boudoir, October-November 1981.
Southampton, New York, Parrish Art Museum, Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Haig Tashjian, April 17-June 6, 1982.
Greenville, South Carolina, Greenville County Museum of Art, American Realist and Impressionist Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Haig Tashjian, March 10-April 22, 1984.
New York, Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc., William Chase/Robert Henri: Between Two American Masters, October 25-November 30, 1985.
St. Petersburg, Florida, Museum of Fine Arts, In the American Spirit: Realism and Impressionism from the Lawrence Collection, March 21-June 13, 1999, no. 18 (as Lady in a Chair).
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Lot Essay

Jennifer Hardin writes of the present work, "Rich colors--golds, mauves, sky blues and a vibrant red--are employed to heighten the sensuality of a woman in a domestic setting. Suggestive of toilette scenes by Degas, the viewer can imagine the women in the process of dressing. The vibrant curtains in the background recall a landscape, heightening the aestheticized nature of the painting...While his [Hawthorne's] subjects were occaisionally genteel, such refined paintings...are rare in his ouevre." (In the American Spirit: Realism and Impressionism from the Lawrence Collection, exhibition catalogue, St. Petersburg, Florida, 1999, p. 30)

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