TEN RARE CHARLES II SILVER AND SILVER-GILT SHELL-FORM DISHES
PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION 
TEN RARE CHARLES II SILVER AND SILVER-GILT SHELL-FORM DISHES

MARK OF SAMUEL HOOD, LONDON, 1675

Details
TEN RARE CHARLES II SILVER AND SILVER-GILT SHELL-FORM DISHES
MARK OF SAMUEL HOOD, LONDON, 1675
Each formed as a scallop shell, three silver-gilt, marked on reverses
4¾ in. (12.1 cm.) long; 17 oz. 10 dwt. (547 gr.) (10)
Provenance
Christie's, London, 20 May 1987, lot 400 (four)
The Collection of the late James Ivory, sold Christie's, London, 8 July 1987, lot 220 (six)
Literature
Christie's Review of the Season, 1987 (six)
The Glory of the Goldsmith: Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, 1989, illus. no. 36, p. 56
Exhibited
"The Glory of the Goldsmith: Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection," London, 1989, no. 36

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Lot Essay

These shells appear to be the earliest known of the open scallop dish form, which did not become common until the mid-18th century. The scallop shell form was often used as the hinged cover for sugar boxes in the late 16th century, but "silversmiths virtually abandoned escallop shell ornament from the 1630s to about 1705." (G. Bernard Hughes, "The Escallop Shell in Silver," Country Life, 6 November 1969, p. 1180)

Two sets of three shells, also by Samuel Hood, and a pair at the Bank of England, dated 1694, are recorded in Michael Clayton's The Collector's Dictionary of the Silver and Gold of Great Britain and North America, 1971, p. 122.
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