A PAIR OF GEORGE II GILTWOOD CONSOLE TABLES
PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF PROFESSOR AND MRS. CLIFFORD AMBROSE TRUESDELL (LOT 267)
A PAIR OF GEORGE II GILTWOOD CONSOLE TABLES

CIRCA 1740

Details
A PAIR OF GEORGE II GILTWOOD CONSOLE TABLES
CIRCA 1740
Each with serpentine Portor marble top above incurved legs carved with foliate and C-scroll decoration on paw feet, with later ebonized plinths one inscribed in black pencil 'L Side', the other 'R. Hand' to top of frieze under marble, slight variations to carving, regilt possibly in the 19th century and with evidence of an 18th century gilding scheme, the central foliate spray to apron apparently re-shaped
31¼in. (79.5cm.) high, 36½in. (93cm.) wide, 18 7/8in. (48cm.) deep (2)
Provenance
Acquired from D.M. Collins, London, 1971.

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Lot Essay

These pier-tables are conceived in George II Roman fashion as sideboard-tables with Portor black marble slabs flecked in gold, and this is echoed by their plinths' bronze-black japanning. Roman-truss brackets support the golden frames which, like the slabs, are scalloped in cupid-bows with columnar corners. Beneath a foliate cornice, their friezes are wreathed by bas-relief ribbons bearing pelta tablets formed of confronted Vitruvian or Ionic wave-scrolls; while reed borders, enriched by flowered ribbon-guilloches, tie their water-bubbled lambrequins. The frames are supported by Roman foliage issuing from the bifurcating volutes of the Pan-reeded trusses, and these are raised by garlanded and hollow-scrolled pilasters that are wrapped by water-leaves and terminate in inward scrolled volutes. Their plinths of addorsed reed-scrolls terminate in bacchic lion-feet.

The tables' design evolved from Marble Table patterns issued in B. Langley's, City and Country Builders and Workmans Treasury of Designs, 1740; but their elegant picturesque form relates to patterns issued in Gaetano Brunetti's, Sixty Different Sorts of ornaments very useful to painters, sculptors, stone-carvers, wood-carvers, silversmiths etc., 1736-7. The latter inspired a related marble-topped table designed for Cusworth Hall, Yorkshire by the celebrated mid-18th century architect James Paine (d.1784), author of Plans, Elevations and Sections of the Mansion House of Doncaster (1751) and close collaborator with the St. Martins Lane cabinet-maker Thomas Chippendale (d.1779) (see G. Smith, Cusworth Hall, 1990, fig. 20).

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