A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER-GILT WINE-COOLERS AND LINERS
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 1… Read more PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF VEENA AND PETER SCHNELL (LOTS 446-454)
A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER-GILT WINE-COOLERS AND LINERS

MARK OF BENJAMIN SMITH, LONDON, 1825

Details
A PAIR OF GEORGE IV SILVER-GILT WINE-COOLERS AND LINERS
MARK OF BENJAMIN SMITH, LONDON, 1825
Tapering lobed, the sides chased with diaperwork within reeded ribs, the lower body and lobes each cast and chased with foliage, with two foliage handles, the rim cast as rocaille, the rim and plain liner each engraved with a crest within a garter and below a marquess' coronet, marked underneath and on liner, further engraved underneath with scratchweights '144"10' and '145"1
10¾ in. (27.5 cm.) high
288 oz. (8,963 gr.)
The crest is that of Campbell, for John Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, 4th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1762-1834). (2)
Provenance
John Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, 4th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1762-1834) and by descent to his son
John Campbell, 2nd Marquess of Breadalbane, 5th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1796-1862) and by descent to his cousin
John Alexander Gavin Campbell, 6th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1824-1871) and by descent to his son
Gavin Campbell, 1st Marquess of Breadalbane, 7th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1851-1922) and by descent to his nephew
Iain Edward Herbert Campbell, 8th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1885-1923) and by descent
Charles William Campbell, 9th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1889-1959)
The Right Hon. The Earl of Breadalbane, M.C.; Christie's, London, 1 July 1936, lot 78.
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 17.5% on the buyer's premium.

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Mary O'Connell
Mary O'Connell

Lot Essay

The title Marquess of Breadalbane was created in 1831 for John Campbell, 4th Earl of Breadalbane and Holland (1762-1834) becoming extinct on the death of his son, also called John, in 1862. The 1820 and 1830's were a busy time for the family as the 1st Marquess had embarked on an ambitious plan to rebuild the family home, Balloch Castle, which has been built in 1552 for Sir Colin Campbell, the Laird of Glenorchy, creating in it's place Taymouth Castle. Taymouth, which was to be part castle and part country mansion, was completed by 1842 when Queen Victoria and Prince Albert spent their honeymoon there. As with her reception throughout Scotland the young Queen was impressed by the welcome she received on her arrival at Taymouth, noting in her diary "The firing of the guns, the cheering of the great crowd, the picturesqueness of the dresses, the beauty of the surrounding country with its rich background of wooded hills, altogether formed one of the finest scenes imaginable."

Taymouth, and the title, passed to John's son on his death in 1834. John, 2 Marquess of Breadalbane was educated at Eton and went on to represent Okehampton in Parliament from 1820-1826 and Perthshire from 1832-1834, going on to take his father's place in the House of Lords later that year. He also served on the Privy Council and as Chamberlain of the Household.

Breadalbane married Elizabeth, daughter of George Baillie and sister of George Baillie-Hamilton, 10th Earl of Haddington, in 1821. The couple had no children. She was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria, dying in Mayfair in1861. Breadalbane survived her by just over a year, dying in Lausanne, in November of the following year. On his death the barony of Breadalbane, earldom of Ormelie and marquessate of Breadalbane became extinct. The other family titles, the estates and of present wine-coolers descended to his cousin John Campbell, for whose son the marquessate was recreated in 1885.

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