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CHURCHILL, Winston S. and TRUMAN, Harry S. Oversized black and white photograph signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), as Prime Minister, and ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, aboard the U.S.S. Williamsburg, 5 January 1952. 14 x 18in., matted and framed, signed by each man on the matt, below their image. [Loosely inserted in frame:] CHURCHILL. Autograph note signed ("Winston S. Churchill") to Harry S. Truman, [Washington], January 1952 1 page, oblong. Provenance: Pamela Harriman, her sale Sotheby's New York, 19 May 1997, lot 125.
CHURCHILL, Winston S. and TRUMAN, Harry S. Oversized black and white photograph signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), as Prime Minister, and ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, aboard the U.S.S. Williamsburg, 5 January 1952. 14 x 18in., matted and framed, signed by each man on the matt, below their image. [Loosely inserted in frame:] CHURCHILL. Autograph note signed ("Winston S. Churchill") to Harry S. Truman, [Washington], January 1952 1 page, oblong. Provenance: Pamela Harriman, her sale Sotheby's New York, 19 May 1997, lot 125.

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CHURCHILL, Winston S. and TRUMAN, Harry S. Oversized black and white photograph signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), as Prime Minister, and ("Harry S. Truman"), as President, aboard the U.S.S. Williamsburg, 5 January 1952. 14 x 18in., matted and framed, signed by each man on the matt, below their image. [Loosely inserted in frame:] CHURCHILL. Autograph note signed ("Winston S. Churchill") to Harry S. Truman, [Washington], January 1952 1 page, oblong. Provenance: Pamela Harriman, her sale Sotheby's New York, 19 May 1997, lot 125.

A SUPERB ASSOCIATION OF THESE TWO GREAT LEADERS just three months after Churchill's return to number 10 Downing Street. While Churchill initially "loathed" (by his own words) the idea of Harry Truman replacing Franklin D. Roosevelt, he came to enjoy better relations with Washington under Truman than under F.D.R., and consequently changed his opinion of the former Senator from Missouri. He used this dinner cruise aboard the Presidential yacht to make amends. He presented Truman with the warm note included here: "To President Truman Whose decisive stroke against Aggression in Korea turned the fortunes of the Free World to the sure hope of Peace." He followed up that sentiment with a more personal admission over dinner: "The last time you and I sat across the conference table was at Potsdam, Mr. President. I must confess, sir, I held you in very low regard then. I loathed your taking the place of Franklin Roosevelt. I misjudged you badly. Since that time, you more than any other man, have saved Western civilization" (quoted in McCullough, 874-875).

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