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LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY (1848-1933)
ANOTHER PROPERTY
LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY (1848-1933)

AN IMPORTANT BRASS-INLAID CHERRY CENTER TABLE, CIRCA 1881

Details
LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY (1848-1933)
An Important Brass-Inlaid Cherry Center Table, circa 1881
29 in. (73.7 cm.) high, 36 in. (92 cm.) wide, 53 7/8 in. (136.8 cm.) deep
Provenance
Christie's, New York, 7 December 2005, lot 329.

Lot Essay

The present table is a rare surviving object from Louis Comfort Tiffany's home at the Bella Apartment House at 48 East 26th Street. The table represents Tiffany's early interests in both furniture and decorating, two aspects of his career that are often dwarfed by his accomplishments in glass, as well as his partnership with Lockwood de Forest and their interest in the crafts of India.

Constructed in cherry and pine, the table incorporates brass-inset teak printing blocks imported from India. Large printing blocks can be seen in images of Tiffany's 72nd Street home, hung on the walls as decoration and some blocks from Tiffany's collection survive in the collection of the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum in Winter Park, Florida. Tiffany's work in the Veteran's Room of the 67th Regiment Armory building in New York also utilizes these elements to add texture and visual interest.

Few objects from Tiffany's Bella Apartment home are known; notably, the leaded glass window seen in the view of the hall is now in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The history of the table after its time in the Bella Apartment House is not certain. The table presumably stayed with the Tiffany family, for it was purchased with part of the land that comprised the Laurelton Hall estate on Long Island, which passed first to Tiffany's daughter, then to the Lindsay family, then to the family of the present owner in the late 1960s.


CAPTION: Tiffany's drawing room in the Bella Apartments, circa 1881

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