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Richard M. Firth (b.1971)
Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's… Read more
Richard M. Firth (b.1971)

Terpischore, Nyria, Britannia and Moonbeam powering over the Royal Yacht Squadron's starting line, 1923

Details
Richard M. Firth (b.1971)
Terpischore, Nyria, Britannia and Moonbeam powering over the Royal Yacht Squadron's starting line, 1923
signed 'RICHARD M FIRTH' (lower right)
oil on canvas
30 x 50 in. (76.3 x 127 cm.)
Special notice

Artist's Resale Right ("Droit de Suite"). Artist's Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to this lot, the buyer agrees to pay us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those Regulations, and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist's collection agent.

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Lot Essay

Terpsichore was designed and built by White Bros. at Itchen in 1920 for Mr. R.H. Lee of Bovey Tracey, Devon. Rigged as a cutter she was registered at 123 tons gross (111 net and 186 Thames) and measured 95 feet in length with a 22 foot beam. After Lee's death in 1924, she was purchased by Sir A. Mortimer Singer, who renamed her Lulworth, a name she has retained ever since.

Nyria was a composite cutter designed by Charles Nicholson and built by Camper & Nicholson at Gosport in 1906. Registered at 81 tons gross (73 net & 169 Thames), she measured 98 feet in length with a 20 foot beam and was first owned by Mr. R.W.N. Young of Savoy Court, London. Sold to Sir Duncan Hay in 1912, he renamed her Lady Camilla and had her re-rigged as an auxiliary ketch for cruising. Resold to Mrs. E.R. Workman of Hayling Island in 1920, she then reverted to her christened name of Nyria as well as to her original cutter rig, and Mrs. Workman raced her until 1928 when she was sold to an Italian owner living in Genoa who renamed her Corsara.

Moonbeam, another composite cutter, was designed and built by William Fife at Fairlie in 1920. Owned by Charles P. Johnson, J.P., of Sevenoaks, she was registered at 93 tons gross (55 net) and measured 80 feet in length with a 17 foot beam. Johnson, for whom she was built, kept and raced her until 1927 when she was sold to H.C. Sutton of Benham Park, Newbury.

For further information on Lulworth's later career and for a note on Britannia please see lot 66.
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