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SPILBERGEN, Joris van (1568-1620). Speculum orientalis occidentalisque Indiae navigationum. Leiden: Nicolaus van Geelkercken, 1619.
SPILBERGEN, Joris van (1568-1620). Speculum orientalis occidentalisque Indiae navigationum. Leiden: Nicolaus van Geelkercken, 1619.

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SPILBERGEN, Joris van (1568-1620). Speculum orientalis occidentalisque Indiae navigationum. Leiden: Nicolaus van Geelkercken, 1619.

Oblong 4o (171 x 236 mm). Large engraved title-vignette, engraved folding world map (Shirley 304) and 24 engraved views, maps and plans, (including 2 folding maps, 2 double-page maps, one folding view and one double-page view). (Title with upper corner repaired, world map with repaired tear and some short tears to folds, a few other repairs, light staining and soiling.) Modern morocco; slipcase.

FIRST EDITION IN LATIN. Van Spilbergen, in command of a small flotilla of six Dutch East India Company ships, sailed for the Moluccas via the Straits of Magellan in 1614, managing to show that it was possible to reach Java from the east via Cape Horn. This was the first attempted circumnavigation of the globe to be carried out with the official support of the Dutch government. This work is an account of his five-year voyage, and the engravings consist of charts, views of ports, islands and native peoples, and sea battles. The first edition in Dutch was published the same year, also in Leiden by Nicolaus van Geelkercken.

Spilbergen's six ships left Texel in August 1614 and reached Brazil that December. Mutinies aboard two of the ships ensued and the four remaining ships passed through the Straits of Magellan. The crews were awed by the massive mountain ranges in Patagonia before making a rapid voyage north to Santa Maria and Valparaiso. They sailed to Africa in July 1615, narrowly missing a treasure fleet. They sailed then to Mexico where they captured and occupied Acapulco for a week. In February 1616 Spilbergen arrived in the Philippines where he raided Manila-bound shipping for nearly a month, and then proceeded to Java. At Batavia in Java he transferred to the ship Amsterdam for the voyage home by way of the Cape of Good Hope, and took with him Willem Cornelis Schouten, Jacob Le Maire and some of the crew of the confiscated vessel Eendracht. Le Maire died on the Indian Ocean, but the remaining crew arrived back in Holland in July 1617. This was the most successful Dutch circumnavigation to date, with little loss of life and considerable profit. Alden & Landis 619/133; Borba de Moraes II:276; Howgego S159; Landwehr (VOC) 361; Sabin 89450; Schilder pp.32-37.

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