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A GEORGE III GILTWOOD MIRROR
A GEORGE III GILTWOOD MIRROR

IN THE MANNER OF THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1760

Details
A GEORGE III GILTWOOD MIRROR
IN THE MANNER OF THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, CIRCA 1760
The rectangular plate within a pierced and scrolled foliate frame surmounted by a bouquet of flowers, the sides hung with floral swags, with chalk inscription to the reverse 'MR. WINN'S BEDROOM', the plate probably 19th century, originally painted white
68½ in. (174 cm.) high; 49 in. (125 cm.) wide
Provenance
Supplied to Sir Rowland Winn, 4th Bt. (1706-1765) or his son, Sir Rowland Winn 5th Bt. (1739-1785), Nostell Priory, Yorkshire and by descent at Nostell.

Condition report

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Lot Essay

Built on the site of a medieval priory, Nostell has been the home of the Winn family for 300 years. In 1733 Sir Rowland Winn, 4th Baronet (d. 1765), commissioned the Yorkshire architect James Paine (d. 1789) to erect a new mansion in the Palladian style. After the death of the 4th Baronet, the 5th Baronet, also Sir Rowland Winn (d. 1786), commissioned Robert Adam to design additional wings, only one of which was to be completed, and to oversee the refurbishment of the house. With the cabinet-maker Thomas Chippendale (d. 1779) providing the furnishings, on the direction of Adam, Nostell encapsulated the rich fusion of Palladian, Rococo, Chinoiserie and Neoclassical styles.

With its scrolled and foliate-wrapped ribbons, rocaille work and floral bouquet, this mirror is likely to have formed part of the house's George III furnishings in the French 'picturesque' style. While documentation is lacking for the furnishing of Nostell at this period, the mirror's form is conceived in the manner of designs from Chippendale's The Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's Director of 1754 and Thomas Johnson's Twelve Girandoles, published in 1755.

Both naties of Yorkshire, Paine and Chippendale were undoubtably acquainted with eachothers work. Like his son the 5th Baronet, the 4th Baronet is likely to have employed Chippendale to furnish parts of Nostell under Paine. Furthermore the 4th Baronet's copy of the Director appears to have been included among papers in the sale of the family's London house in St. James's Square in 1785 (see Christie's, London, 11 April 1785, No. XVIII, Books, Folio, No. 19).

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