Lot Content

Global notice COVID-19 Important notice
English School, circa 1850
VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 2… Read more
English School, circa 1850

Trafalgar Square

Details
English School, circa 1850
Trafalgar Square
oil on canvas
25 x 30 in. (63.4 x 76.2 cm.)
Special notice

VAT rate of 5% is payable on hammer price and at 20% on the buyer's premium.

Condition report

If you wish to view the condition report of this lot, please sign in to your account.

Sign in
View condition report

Lot Essay

The Trafalgar Square as seen in the current lot is the work of both John Nash, who conceived the square in the 1820s on the orders of George IV as part of his redevelopment of the area around Charing Cross, and Sir Charles Barry, whose remit was to make the area more impressive. To the north, the square is dominated by the impressive facade of The National Gallery and next to that we see the spire and distinctive frontage of the church of St Martin-in-the- Fields. In the foreground, at the junction of Whitehall and Trafalgar Square, is the equestrian bronze of Charles I, on the site of the original Eleanor Cross (a replica of which now stands by Charing Cross station). This statue was the first of its kind in England and was cast by in 1633 by Hubert Le Sueur, acting on a commission from the King's Lord Treasurer, Sir Richard Weston for his home, Mortlake Park. It was placed in its current location in 1674-75.
At the centre of Trafalgar Square stands the 50 metre high Nelson's column, which celebrates Admiral Horatio Nelson, England's most famous naval hero who died during the Battle of Trafalgar on 1805,a victory which thwarted the maritime ambitions of Napoleon Bonaparte and France. The column to commemorate him was the result of the public campaign by a Nelson memorial committee in the late 1830s who felt that there should be a public memorial to the great man. Funds were raised towards the erection of such monument and a public competition held to decide what that monument should be. The winning design was by William Railton who suggested a Corinthian column topped by a statue of Nelson. Work commenced in 1840 and the memorial was completed in 1843. Fourteen stone masons held a dinner party on top of the plinth before the statue of Nelson was placed there. It is also worth noting that Nelson's column was considered such a potent symbol of London that Hitler made plans to remove it to Berlin in the aftermath of a successful German invasion of Great Britain in 1940.

More from The London Sale

View All
View All