A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER SAUCE BOATS FROM THE ANSON SERVICE
Property from the Estate of Benjamin F. Edwards III
A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER SAUCE BOATS FROM THE ANSON SERVICE

MARK OF PAUL DE LAMERIE, LONDON, 1739

Details
A PAIR OF GEORGE II SILVER SAUCE BOATS FROM THE ANSON SERVICE
MARK OF PAUL DE LAMERIE, LONDON, 1739
Each with oval body on four cast shell feet, applied with swags of flowers and foliage in high relief, the handle cast in the form of a cherub head, engraved under the rim with crest and Baron's coronet, each marked under base
7½ in. long (19 cm); 51 oz. (1,595 gr.) (2)
Provenance
George, 1st Baron Anson, thence by descent to
George, Lord Anson, the Earl of Lichfield, sold Christie's, London, 8 June 1893, lot 13 or 14
Gladys Vanderbilt Széchneyi, removed from the Breakers, Newport, Rhode Island, sold Sotheby's New York, 16 September 1972, lot 499
Christie's, New York, 19 October 2001, lot 252
M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans, 2003

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Lot Essay

The crest and coronet are those of George, Lord Anson, Admiral of the Fleet (1697-1762)

Sent to sea at age 14, George Anson (1697-1762) became famous for circumnavigating the globe in 1740-44. The journey was so perilous that his passage around Cape Horn reduced his squadron from six ships to just one, the Centurion. Continuing across the Pacific alone, the Centurion seized a Spanish treasure ship, the Nuestra Señora de Cavadonga, en route from Manila to Acapulco.

Anson's return to England was celebrated by a parade of the Spanish booty, requiring 32 wagons, through the streets of London. A contemporary account described "2,600,000 Pieces of Eight, 150,000 ounces of plate, 10 bars of Gold, and a large quantity of gold and silver dust"; in the whole to the amount of £1,250,000. Anson's personal share of the booty was prodigious, allowing him to make improvements to the family estate at Shugborough and to amass a vast dinner service in silver. From 1744 to 1750, Anson commissioned some 40 pieces of silver of magnificent quality from Lamerie. This pair of sauceboats, with another pair, and a set of four matching stands, all 1739, were likely given to Anson by his father-in-law, the Earl of Hardwicke. These sauceboats formed the nucleus of a collection that Anson expanded into one of the greatest English silver services ever made. The sauceboats and 55 other lots of the Admiral's Lamerie silver were sold at Christie's, London, June 8, 1893, consigned by the Earl of Lichfield, a descendent of Anson's sister. (See Christopher Hartop, "Admiral George Anson and his de Lamerie Silver," The Magazine Antiques, June 1994, pp. 850-57.)

The matching pair of sauceboats (lot 13 or 14 from the 1893 sale) are in the collection of the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, Los Angeles, and illustrated in Timothy B. Schroder, The Francis E. Fowler Jr. Collection of Silver, 1991, no. 38, p. 48. The four companion stands (lots 15-18 in the 1893 sale) are in the Gans Collection, Virginia Museum of Art, illustrated in Joseph R. Bliss, The Jerome and Rita Gans Collection of English Silver, no. 12. p. 40-43. One of the four stands now in the Gans Collection was sold from the collection of Mrs. R. M. Robertson, Christie's, New York, October 27, 1987. no. 429.
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